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hollow (adj.)

c. 1200, adjective developed from Old English holh (n.) "hollow place, hole," from Proto-Germanic *hul-, from PIE root *kel- (1) "to cover, conceal, save." The figurative sense of "insincere" is attested from 1520s. Related: Hollowly. Spelling development followed that of fallow, sallow. Adverbial use in carry it hollow "take it completely" is first recorded 1660s, of unknown origin or connection. Hollow-eyed "having deep, sunken eyes" is attested from 1520s.

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hollow (v.)
late 14c., "to make hollow," holowen, from hollow (adj.). Related: Hollowed; hollowing. Old English had holian "to hollow out."
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hollow (n.)
"lowland, valley, basin," 1550s, probably a modern formation from hollow (adj.), which is from Old English holh (n.) "cave, den; internal cavity."
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-eyed 
in compounds, "having eyes" (of a specified kind), by c. 1300, from eye (n.).
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pop-eyed (adj.)

"having full, bulging, or prominent eyes," 1820; see pop (v.) + -eyed.

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ox-eyed (adj.)

"having large, full eyes," 1620s, from ox + -eyed. An epithet used by Homer (boōpis) of the goddess Hera (Juno) and beautiful women. Oxeye has since c. 1400 been a name given to various flowering plants thought to resemble the eye of an ox; it is also used of certain birds, fishes, and a type of mirror.

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wall-eyed (adj.)
c. 1300, wawil-eghed, wolden-eiged, "having very light-colored eyes," also "having parti-colored eyes," from Old Norse vagl-eygr "having speckled eyes," from vagl "speck in the eye; beam, upper cross-beam, chicken-roots, perch," from Proto-Germanic *walgaz, from PIE *wogh-lo-, suffixed form of root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle." The prehistoric sense evolution would be from "weigh" to "lift," to "hold, support." Meaning "having one or both eyes turned out" (and thus showing much white) is first recorded 1580s.
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blue-eyed (adj.)
"having blue eyes," c. 1600, from blue (adj.1) + -eyed. Meaning "favored; innocent" is by 1924.
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louche (adj.)
"dubious, disreputable," 1819, from French louche "squinting," from Old French lousche, lois (12c.) "cross-eyed, squint-eyed, lop-sided," from Latin lusca, fem. of luscus "blind in one eye, one-eyed," from Proto-Italic *luk-sko- "with partial sight, visually handicapped," from PIE *luk- "to see" or *leuk- "light" [de Vaan].
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