Etymology
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holding (n.)
early 13c., "act of holding;" mid-15c. as "that which is held," verbal noun of hold (v.). Old English healding meant "keeping, observance." As a football (soccer) penalty, from 1866. Meaning "property held," especially stock shares, is from 1570s. Holding operation is from 1942.
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holding (adj.)
"in possession of narcotics," 1935, special use of present-participle adjective from hold (v.).
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propertied (adj.)

"owning or holding property," 1760, from property (n.).

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tenacity (n.)

early 15c., tenacite, "quality of holding firmly," from Old French ténacité (14c.) and directly from Latin tenacitas "an act of holding fast," from tenax (genitive tenacis) "holding fast, gripping, clingy; firm, steadfast," from tenere "to hold" (from PIE root *ten- "to stretch").  The PIE root produced two Latin verbs, tenere "to hold, grasp," and tendere "to stretch" (as in tend (v.1)), which perhaps is from an inflected form in the PIE verb. Both Latin verbs have past participle tentus.

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oil-tank (n.)

"tank for holding oil," 1862, from oil (n.) + tank (n.).

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right-thinking (adj.)

"holding sound or acceptable views," 1829; see right (adj.1)  + think (v.).

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paradoxology (n.)

"the holding and defending of opinions contrary to those generally prevalent," 1640s; see paradox + -logy.

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suitcase (n.)
1898, from suit (n.) + case (n.2). Originally a case for holding a suit of clothes. In reference to small nuclear weapons, 1954.
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retention (n.)

late 14c., retencioun, "the keeping of fluid or secretions within the body," also "power of capacity," from Latin retentionem (nominative retentio) "a retaining, a holding back," noun of action from past-participle stem of retinere (see retain).

The mental sense of "remembrance, fact of retaining things in the mind" is from late 15c. As "act of retaining or holding as one's own," from 1610s; retention rate is by 1972.

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