Etymology
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hire (v.)

Old English hyrian "pay for service, employ for wages, engage," from Proto-Germanic *hurjan (source also of Danish hyre, Old Frisian hera, Dutch huren, German heuern "to hire, rent"), of uncertain origin. Reflexively, "to agree to work for wages" from mid-13c. Related: Hired; hiring.

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hire (n.)

"payment for work, use, or services; wages," from late Old English hyr "wages; interest, usury," from the verb or from a Proto-Germanic *hurja- (see hire (v.)). Cognate with Old Frisian here, Dutch huur, German heuer, Danish hyre.

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dehire (v.)

a euphemism for "to fire from employment," by 1967, from de- "do the opposite of" + hire (v.). Related: Dehired; dehiring.

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hireling (n.)

"one who works for hire," Old English hyrling; see hire (v.) + -ling. Now only disparaging, "one who acts only for mercenary motives," a sense that emerged late 16c. As an adjective by 1580s.

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her (possessive case)

Old English hire, third person singular feminine genitive form of heo "she" (see she). With absolute form hers.

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charter (v.)

early 15c., "provide with a charter," from charter (n.). Meaning "to hire by special contract" is attested from 1806. Related: Chartered; chartering.

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hackneyed (adj.)

"trite, so overused as to have become uninteresting," 1749, figurative use of past-participle adjective from hackney (v.) "use a horse for riding" (1570s), hence "make common by indiscriminate use" (1590s), from hackney (n.), and compare hack (n.2) in its specialized sense of "one who writes anything for hire." From 1769 as "kept for hire."

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virago (n.)

late 14c., "man-like or heroic woman, woman of extraordinary stature, strength and courage," from Latin virago "female warrior, heroine, amazon," from vir "man" (from PIE root *wi-ro- "man"). Ælfric (c. 1000), following Vulgate, used it in Genesis ii.23 as the name Adam gave to Eve (KJV = woman):

Beo hire nama Uirago, þæt is, fæmne, forðan ðe heo is of hire were genumen.

Related: Viraginous.

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a-ha (interj.)

also aha, exclamation of surprise or delighted discovery, late 14c., from ah + ha.

This seely widewe and hire doughtres two ... cryden out "harrow!" and "weloway! A ha! þe fox!" and after him they ran [Chaucer]
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