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hinder (v.)
Old English hindrian "to harm, injure, impair, check, repress," from Proto-Germanic *hinderojan (source also of Old Norse hindra, Old Frisian hinderia, Dutch hinderen, Old High German hintaron, German hindern "to keep back"), derivative verb from a root meaning "on that side of, behind" (see hind (adj.)); thus the ground sense is "to put or keep back," though this sense in English is recorded only from late 14c. Related: Hindered; hindering.
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hinder (adj.)
"situated in the rear, pertaining to the rear, toward the back," late 14c., probably from an unrecorded Old English adjective from hinder (adv.) "behind, back, afterward," but treated as a comparative of hind (adj.). Related to Old High German hintar, German hinter, Gothic hindar "behind" (prep.).

Middle English had hinderhede, literally "hinder-hood; posterity in time, inferiority in rank;" and hinderling "person fallen from moral or social respectability, wretch," from an Old English term of contempt for a person devoid of honor. Also compare Scottish hinderlins "the buttocks."
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unhindered (adj.)
1610s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of hinder (v.).
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hindrance (n.)
mid-15c., a hybrid from hindren (see hinder (v.)) on model of French-derived words in -ance.
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hindermost (adj.)
late 14c., hyndermest; see hinder (adj.) + -most. Middle English also had hindermore, which, as a noun, could mean "the hinder parts."
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hinterland (n.)

1890, originally in geography, "a region behind and inland from a port city that is closely tied to it economically," from German Hinterland, from hinter "behind" (see hinder (adj.)) + Land "country" (see land (n.)). What in English would be called the back-country. George G. Chisholm, in "Handbook of Commercial Geography," translated the German word as hinderland, supposedly first in his 1888 edition, and Hinder-land also was used from 1881 by Richard Burton and others to translate an Egyptian hieroglyphic for "Syria." Hinterland came to prominence in the language of European colonialism in reference to an inland region behind a port along a coast that was claimed by a state.

[The East Africa Company] have seized a vast region, and the delightful terms of Hinterland, Sphere of Influence, Protectorate, Colony, have come into existence, with the common feature of plunder of the possessions, and destroying the lives, of unoffending millions. [Robert Needham Cust, "A Monroe-Doctrine for Africa," 1898]
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let (n.)

"stoppage, obstruction" (obsolete unless in legal contracts), late 12c., from archaic verb letten "to hinder," from Old English lettan "hinder, delay, impede," etymologically "make late," from Proto-Germanic *latjan (source also of Old Saxon lettian "to hinder," Old Norse letja "to hold back," Old High German lezzen "to stop, check," Gothic latjan "to hinder, make late"), related to *lata-, source of late (adj.), from PIE root *‌‌lē- "to let go, slacken."

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obstructive (adj.)

"having the quality of obstructing, serving or intended to hinder, delay, or annoy," 1610s, from Latin obstruct-, past-participle stem of obstruere "to build up, block, block up, build against, stop, bar, hinder" (see obstruction) + -ive.

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astern (adv.)
"toward the hinder part of a ship," 1620s, from a- (1) "on" + stern (n.).
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thwart (v.)
"oppose, hinder," mid-13c., from thwart (adv.). Related: Thwarted; thwarting.
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