Etymology
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brig (n.)
"two-masted square-rigged vessel," 1720, colloquial shortening of brigantine (q.v.). Meaning "a ship's jail" is by 1841, American English, perhaps from the use of such vessels as prison ships upon retirement from active duty.
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hermaphrodite (n.)
late 14c. (harmofroditus), from Latin hermaphroditus, from Greek hermaphroditos "person partaking of the attributes of both sexes," as a proper name, the son of Hermes and Aphrodite, who, in Ovid, was loved by the nymph Salmacis so ardently that she prayed for complete union with him and as a result they were united bodily, combining male and female characteristics.

Also used figuratively in Middle English of "one who improperly occupies two offices." As a name for the condition, Middle English had hermofrodito (late 14c.), hermofrodisia (early 15c.). As an adjective, from c. 1600. Also used of things of two natures, such as hermaphrodite brig, for a vessel square-masted fore and schooner-rigged aft.
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androgyne (n.)
"a hermaphrodite," mid-12c., from Medieval Latin androgyne (fem.), from Greek androgynos "a hermaphrodite, a woman-man" (see androgynous). Related: Androgynism.
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hermaphroditic (adj.)
1620s, from hermaphrodite + -ic. Earlier form was hermaphroditical (c. 1600).
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morphodite (n.)

1839, colloquial mangling of hermaphrodite based on morpho-. An earlier mangling was mophrodite (1706); also see dyke.

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hermaphrodism (n.)
"physical condition of having both male and female sexual organs," 1799, from French hermaphrodisme (1750s); see hermaphrodite + -ism. Hermaphroditism is from 1807; hermaphrodeity is from 1610s.
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Bridget 

fem. proper name, from Irish Brighid, goddess associated with fire, spring, fertility, healing, poetry and smithcraft, from brigh "strength," from Celtic *brig-o-, from PIE *bhrgh-nt- "high, mighty," from root *bhergh- (2) "high."

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brio (n.)

"liveliness, vivacity," 1734, from Italian brio "mettle, fire, life," perhaps a shortened derivative of Latin ebrius "drunk." Or via Provençal briu "vigor," from Celtic *brig-o- "strength," from PIE root *gwere- (1) "heavy." Probably it entered English via the musical instruction con brio.

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ambisexual (adj.)
"unisex" (of clothing), also "bisexual," 1912 in the jargon of psychology, from ambi- + sexual. Ambosexous (1650s) and ambosexual (1935) both were used in the sense "hermaphrodite." Ambisextrous is recorded from 1929 as a humorous coinage based on ambidextrous.
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Scratch (n.2)
in Old Scratch "the Devil," 1740, from earlier Scrat, from Old Norse skratte "goblin, wizard," a word which was used in late Old English to gloss "hermaphrodite;" probably originally "monster" (compare Old High German scraz, scrato "satyr, wood demon," German Schratt, Old High German screz "a goblin, imp, dwarf;" borrowed from Germanic into Slavic, as in Polish skrzat "a goblin").
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