Etymology
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herm (n.)
in ancient Athens, "square pillar of stone topped by a carved human head" (conventionally that of Hermes), used as a milestone, boundary marker, etc., 1570s, from Latin herma, from Hermes (q.v.).
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harm (n.)
Old English hearm "hurt, pain; evil, grief; insult," from Proto-Germanic *harmaz (source also of Old Saxon harm, Old Norse harmr "grief, sorrow," Old Frisian herm "insult; pain," Old High German harm, German Harm "grief, sorrow, harm"), from PIE *kormo- "pain." To be in harm's way is from 1660s.
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