Etymology
Advertisement
height (n.)

Old English hiehþu, Anglian hehþo "highest part or point, summit; the heavens, heaven," from root of heah "high" (see high) + -itha, Germanic abstract noun suffix (as in width, depth; see -th (2)). Compare Old Norse hæð, Middle Dutch hoochte, Old High German hohida, Gothic hauhiþa "height." Meaning "distance from bottom to top" is from late 13c. Meaning "excellence, high degree of a quality" is late 14c. Century Dictionary says "there is no reason for the distinction of vowel between high and height. The modern pronunciation with -t emerged 13c. but wasn't established until 19c.; Milton used highth and heighth is still colloquial in English. Compare Dutch hoogte, Danish hjöde.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
heighth (n.)

obsolete or colloquial variant of height (q.v.).

Related entries & more 
heighten (v.)

mid-15c., heightenen, transitive, "to exalt, to honor or raise to high position," from height + -en (1). Intransitive sense of "to become higher" is from 1560s. Related: Heightened; heightening.

Related entries & more 
-th (2)

suffix forming nouns of action, state, or quality from verbs or adjectives (such as depth, strength, truth), from Old English -ðu, , from Proto-Germanic *-itho (cognates: Old Norse , Old High German -ida, Gothic -iþa), abstract noun suffix, from PIE *-ita (cognates: Sanskrit -tati-; Greek -tet-; Latin -tati-, as in libertatem "liberty" from liber "free"). Sometimes in English reduced to -t, especially after -h- (as in height).

Related entries & more 
hauteur (n.)

"a haughty bearing, arrogance of manner," 1620s, from French hauteur "haughtiness, arrogance," literally "height," from Old French hauture "height, loftiness; grandeur, majesty" (12c.), from haut (see haught).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
stature (n.)

early 14c., "natural height of a body, height," from Old French stature, estature "build, structure," from Latin statura "height, size of body, size, growth," from PIE *ste-tu-, from root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm," with derivatives meaning "place or thing that is standing." Figurative sense first recorded 1834.

Related entries & more 
altitude (n.)

late 14c., "elevation above the horizon" (of stars, planets), from Latin altitudinem (nominative altitudo) "height, altitude," from altus "high" (literally "grown tall," from PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish"). The general sense of "space upward, height, vertical extent" is from early 15c. Related: Altitudinal; altitudinous.

Related entries & more 
hypso- 

word-forming element meaning "height," from Greek hypsos "height, top," from PIE *upso-, from root *upo "under," also "up from under," hence also "over" The Greek word is cognate with Sanskrit os "above, over," Old Church Slavonic vysoku "high."

Related entries & more 
overlook (n.)

"place that affords a view from a height," by 1861, from overlook (v.).

Related entries & more 
Cannes 

city on the French Riviera, perhaps from a pre-Indo-European word *kan, meaning "height." The film festival dates from 1946.

Related entries & more