Etymology
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heavenly (adj.)

Old English heofonlic "celestial; divine;" see heaven + -ly (1). Meaning "beautiful, divinely lovely" is late 14c., often (though not originally) with reference to the celestial "music of the spheres;" weakened sense of "excellent, enjoyable" is first recorded 1874. The heavenly bodies (stars, planets, etc.) attested from late 14c. Related: Heavenliness.

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heavens (n.)

"realm of the heavenly bodies," 1670s, from heaven.

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Celeste 

fem. proper name, from French céleste (11c.) "sky, heaven," from Latin caelestis "heavenly" (see celestial).

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astrolatry (n.)

"worship of heavenly bodies," 1670s; see astro- "star" + -latry "worship of."

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Urania 

name of the Muse of astronomy and celestial forces, from Latin Urania, from Greek Ourania, fem. of ouranios, literally "heavenly," from ouranos (see Uranus).

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unearthly (adj.)

1610s, "heavenly, sublime," from un- (1) "not" + earthly. Sense of "ghostly, weird" is attested by 1802. Related: Unearthliness.

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orbital (adj.)

1540s, "of or pertaining to the eye socket;" 1839 with reference to heavenly bodies; from orbit (n.) + -al (1).

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Selina 

fem. proper name, nativized form of French Céline, from Latin caelina "heavenly," from caelum "heaven, sky" (see celestial). The spelling sometimes is influenced by Selene.

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astrophysicist (n.)

"expert in the physics of heavenly bodies," also astro-physicist, 1869, from astro- + physicist. Related: Astrophysics (1877); astrophysical.

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earthly (adj.)

Old English eorþlic "worldly, pertaining to this world" (as opposed to spiritual or heavenly); see earth (n.) + -ly (1). The sense "belonging to or originating in the earth" is from mid-15c.

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