Etymology
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eye-shade (n.)

also eyeshade, "a shade for the eyes," 1808 as a type of headgear, from eye (n.) + shade (n.).

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coif (n.)

late 13c., "close-fitting cap," from Old French coife "skull-cap, cap worn under a helmet, headgear" (12c., Modern French coiffe), from Late Latin coifa "a cap, hood" (source of Italian cuffia, Spanish cofia, escofia), of West Germanic origin (compare Old High German kupphia, Middle High German kupfe "cap"). As "light cap of lace worn by women," mid-15c.

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Juliet 

fem. proper name, from Italian Giulietta, diminutive of Giulia "Julia" (see Julia). Compare French Juliette. The Juliet cap (1904) was so called for its resemblance to pseudo-medieval headgear worn in stage productions of "Romeo and Juliet."

A Parisian fancy which is finding little favor here, is the Juliet cap. It is a net of beads or of meshed cord jewelled or beaded at the intersections. Clustered bunches of blossoms and foliage are set at each side of the cap, above the ears. ["Fabrics, Fancy-Goods & Notions," trade publication, New York, January 1904]
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milliner (n.)

by 1520s, "vendor of fancy wares, man who deals in articles for women's wear," probably originally Milaner "native or resident of Milan" (in Middle English Milain, Milein, Millein, etc.), the northern Italian city famous for straw works, fancy goods, silks, ribbons, bonnets, and cutlery. Milener as "a native or inhabitant of Milan" is attested in English from mid-15c.  From 16c. to 18c. it is difficult to know whether the English word means a type of merchant or "a resident of Milan" who is selling certain wares. The original milliners were men; by 1713 the word was being used of "a woman who makes and sells bonnets and other headgear for women," and this was the prevailing sense of the word 19c.

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