Etymology
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hatred (n.)
early 13c., from hate (v.) + rare suffix -red (indicating condition or state), from Old English ræden "state, condition," related to verb rædan "to advise, discuss, rule, read, guess" (from PIE root *re- "to reason, count;" compare the second element of kindred and proper names Æþelræd and Alfred).
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self-hatred (n.)

"hatred of oneself," especially when contrasted with one's own ideal self, by 1670s; see self- + hatred. Self-hate (n.) is attested by 1947.

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*re- 

*rē-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to reason, count;" a variant of PIE root *ar-, also arə-, "to fit together." 

It forms all or part of: Alfred; arraign; arithmetic; Conrad; dread; Eldred; Ethelred; hatred; hundred; kindred; logarithm; Ralph; rate (n.) "estimated value or worth;" rathskeller; ratify; ratio; ration; read; reason; rede; rhyme; riddle (n.1) "word-game;" rite; ritual.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit radh- "to succeed, accomplish;" Greek arithmos "number, amount;" Latin reri "to consider, confirm, ratify," ritus "rite, religious custom;" Old Church Slavonic raditi "to take thought, attend to;" Old Irish im-radim "to deliberate, consider;" Old English rædan "to advise, counsel, persuade; read;" Old English, Old High German rim "number;" Old Irish rim "number," dorimu "I count."

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misandry (n.)

"hatred of males," 1878, from miso- "hatred" + andros "of man, male," genitive of anēr "man" (from PIE root *ner- (2) "man"). Related: Misandrist.

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miso- 

word-forming element of Greek origin meaning "hater, hatred," before vowels, mis-, from Greek misos "hatred," misein "to hate," of uncertain etymology, perhaps from a Pre-Greek word. It was productive as a word-forming element in ancient Greek, for instance misoagathia "hatred of good or goodness;" misoponein "to hate work." In English it formed many compounds now obscure or recherche, but some perhaps still useful, such as  misocapnic (adj.) "hating (tobacco) smoke," misocyny "hatred of dogs," misoneism "hatred of novelty."

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misoneism (n.)

"hatred of novelty or innovation," 1884, from French misonéisme (1884), from Greek misos "hatred" (see miso-) + neos "new" (see new) + -ism. Related: Misoneist; misoneistic.

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odium (n.)

c. 1600, "fact of being hated," from Latin odium "ill-will, hatred, grudge, animosity; offense, offensive conduct," related to odi "I hate" (infinitive odisse), from PIE *eod-io- "hatred" (source also of Greek odyssasthai "to be angry, be grieved, grumble," Armenian ateam "I hate," Old Norse atall, Old English atol "evil, dire, horrid, loathsome"). Meaning "hatred, detestation" is from 1650s. Often in an extended form, such as odium theologicum "hatred which is proverbially characteristic of theological disputes" (1670s).

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misanthropy (n.)

"hatred or dislike of mankind, the habit of taking the worst possible view of human character and motives," 1650s, from Greek misanthrōpia "hatred of mankind," from misanthrōpos "hating mankind" (see misanthrope).

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Negrophobe (n.)

"one who has violent aversion to or hatred of Negroes," 1864, from Negro + -phobe. Often pejorative.

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