Etymology
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hasten (v.)
1560s, transitive and intransitive, extended form of haste (v.) with -en (1). Related: Hastened; hastening.
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accelerate (v.)
Origin and meaning of accelerate

1520s, "hasten the occurrence of;" 1590s, "make quicker" (implied in accelerating), from Latin acceleratus, past participle of accelerare "to hasten, quicken" (trans.), "make haste" (intrans.), from ad "to" (see ad-) + celerare "hasten," from celer "swift," which is perhaps from PIE *keli- "speeding" (see celerity). The intransitive sense of "go faster, become faster" in English is from 1640s. Related: Accelerated; accelerative.

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acceleration (n.)
Origin and meaning of acceleration

"act or condition of going faster," 1530s, from Latin accelerationem (nominative acceleratio) "a hastening," noun of action from past-participle stem of accelerare "to hasten, quicken," from ad "to" (see ad-) + celerare "hasten," from celer "swift," which is perhaps from PIE *keli- "speeding" (see celerity). 

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accelerant (n.)
Origin and meaning of accelerant
"that which hastens," especially combustion, 1854, from Latin accelerantem (nominative accelerans), present participle of accelerare "to hasten, quicken" (see accelerate). As an adjective from 1890.
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haste (v.)
late 13c., from Old French haster "hurry, make haste; urge, hurry along" (Modern French hâter), from haste "haste, urgency" (see haste). Now largely superseded by hasten (1560s). Related: Hasted; hasting.
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scurry (v.)

"hasten along, move precipitately," 1810, perhaps from hurry-scurry (1732), a reduplication of hurry (v.), or imitative. As a noun, "a hurried movement, fluttering or bustling haste," 1823, from the verb.

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accelerando (adv.)

musical instruction indicating a passage to be played with gradually increasing speed, 1842, from Italian accelerando, present participle of accelerare, from Latin accelerare "to hasten, quicken" (see accelerate).

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helter-skelter (adv.)
also helter skelter, 1590s, perhaps a rhyming reduplication from skelte "to hasten, scatter hurriedly," or merely "a riming formula vaguely imitative of hurry and confusion" [Century Dictionary] as in harum-scarum, etc. As an adjective from 1785.
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fidget (n.)
1670s, as the fidget "uneasiness," later the fidgets, from a verb fidge "move restlessly" (16c., surviving longest in Scottish), perhaps from Middle English fiken "to fidget, hasten" (see fike (v.)).
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conation (n.)

in the philosophical sense of "voluntary agency" (embracing desire and volition), 1836, from Latin conationem (nominative conatio) "an endeavoring, effort," noun of action from past participle stem of conari "to endeavor, to try," from PIE *kona-, from root *ken- "to hasten, set oneself in motion" (see deacon).

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