Etymology
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Jordan 

river in ancient Palestine; the crossing of it is symbolic of death in high-flown language as a reference to Numbers xxxiii.51. Also a type of pot or vessel (late 14c.), especially a chamber-pot, but the sense there is unknown. The modern nation-state dates to 1921. Related: Jordanian.

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kingdom (n.)

Old English cyningdom; see king (n.) + -dom. Cognate with Old Saxon kuningdom, Middle Dutch koninghdom, Old Norse konungdomr. The usual Old English word was cynedom; Middle English also had kingrick (for second element, see the first element in Reichstag). Meaning "one of the realms of nature" is from 1690s.

Kingdom-come (n.) "the next world, the hereafter" (1785), originally slang, is from the Lord's Prayer, where it is an archaic simple present subjunctive ("may Thy kingdom come") in reference to the spiritual reign of God or Christ.

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West Bank 

in reference to the former Jordanian territory west of the River Jordan, 1967.

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U.K. 

abbreviation of United Kingdom, attested from 1883.

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Artaxerxes 

Persian masc. proper name, in classical history a son of Xerxes II, also a son of Darius, from Greek Artaxerxes, from Old Persian Artaxšaca, literally "having a kingdom of justice," from arta- "justice" + xšaca "kingdom."

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faerie (n.)

supernatural kingdom, "Elfland," c. 1300, from Old French fairie; see fairy.

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Brexit (n.)

"withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union," 2012, from Britain + exit.

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Essex 

Old English East-Seaxe "East Saxons," who had a 7c. kingdom there. See east, Saxon.

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Pisgah 

name of the mountain east of the River Jordan, whence Moses was allowed to view the Promised Land he could not enter (Deuteronomy iii.27); with figurative use from 1640s. The name is Hebrew, literally "cleft."

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