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harm (v.)
Old English hearmian "to hurt, injure," from the noun (see harm (n.)). It has ousted Old English skeþþan (see scathe (v.)) in all but a few senses. Related: Harmed; harming.
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harm (n.)
Old English hearm "hurt, pain; evil, grief; insult," from Proto-Germanic *harmaz (source also of Old Saxon harm, Old Norse harmr "grief, sorrow," Old Frisian herm "insult; pain," Old High German harm, German Harm "grief, sorrow, harm"), from PIE *kormo- "pain." To be in harm's way is from 1660s.
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harmful (adj.)
mid-14c., from harm (n.) + -ful. Related: Harmfully. Old English had hearmful but the modern word probably is a Middle English formation.
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unharmed (adj.)
mid-14c., from un- (1) "not" + past participle of harm (v.).
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harmless (adj.)
c. 1300, "uninjured," from harm (n.) + -less. Meaning "without power or disposition to harm" is from 1530s. Related: Harmlessly; harmlessness.
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grievance (n.)
c. 1300, "state of being aggrieved," from Old French grevance "harm, injury, misfortune; trouble, suffering, agony, sorrow," from grever "to harm, to burden, be harmful to" (see grief). In reference to a cause of such a condition, from late 15c.
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nuisance (n.)

c. 1400, "injury, hurt, harm," from Anglo-French nusaunce, Old French nuisance "harm, wrong, damage," from past-participle stem of nuire "to harm," from Latin nocere "to hurt" (from PIE root *nek- (1) "death"). Sense has softened over time, to "anything obnoxious to a community" (bad smells, pests, eyesores), 1660s, then "source of annoyance, something personally disagreeable" (1831). Applied to persons from 1690s. As an adjective by 1889; the older adjective nuisant was always rare and now is obsolete.

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safely (adv.)
late 13c., "without risk; without harm;" mid-14c., "without risk of error," from safe (adj.) + -ly (2).
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innocuous (adj.)

"harmless, producing no ill effect, incapable of harm or mischief," 

1590s, from Latin innocuus "harmless; innocent; inoffensive," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + nocuus "hurtful," from root of nocere "to injure, harm," from *nok-s-, suffixed form of PIE root *nek- (1) "death." Related: Innocuously; innocuousness.

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nocuous (adj.)

1630s, "noxious, harmful," from Latin nocuus "harmful," from stem of nocere "to hurt, injure, harm" (from PIE root *nek- (1) "death"). Especially of venomous serpents.

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