Etymology
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perm (n.)

in hairdressing, 1927, a shortened form of permanent wave (1909; see permanent). The verb is recorded by 1928. Related: Permed.

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hairdresser (n.)

also hair-dresser, 1770, from hair + dresser. Related: Hairdressing (1771).

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highlight (v.)

1861, "to give high lights to" (a painting, engraving, etc.), from highlight (n.). Figurative sense of "give prominence to, emphasize" is by 1944. Hairdressing sense is 1942. Related: Highlighted; highlighting.

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highlight (n.)

1650s, originally of paintings, "the brightest part of a subject," from high (adj.) + light (n.). High lights came also to mean the lighter and brighter paints and colors used in making pictures (as opposed to  middle tints and shade tints), and the terminology carried over into photography and engraving. The figurative sense of "outstanding feature or characteristic" is by 1855 (as highlights give effect to a picture) but was not common before c. 1920. Hairdressing sense is 1941. Related: Highlights.

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tease (v.)

formerly also teaze, Old English tæsan "pluck, pull, tear; pull apart, comb" (fibers of wool, flax, etc.), from Proto-Germanic *taisijan (source also of Danish tæse, Middle Dutch tesen, Dutch tezen "to draw, pull, scratch," Old High German zeisan "to tease, pick wool").

The original sense is of running thorns through wool or flax to separate, shred, or card the fibers. The figurative sense of "vex, worry, annoy" (sometimes done in good humor) emerged 1610s. For similar sense development, compare heckle. Hairdressing sense is recorded from 1957. Related: Teased; teasing; teasingly.

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salon (n.)

1690s, "large room or apartment in a palace or great house," from French salon "reception room" (17c.), from Italian salone "large hall," from sala "hall," from a Germanic source (compare Old English sele, Middle English salle, Old Norse salr "hall," Old High German sal "hall, house," German Saal), from Proto-Germanic *salaz.

This is reconstructed to be from a PIE *sel- (1) "human settlement" (source also of Old Church Slavonic selo "courtyard, village," obsolete Polish siolo, Russian selo "village," Lithuanian sala "village."

The sense of "reception room of a Parisian lady" is by 1810 (the woman who hosts one is a salonnière). The meaning "gathering of fashionable people" is by 1888; the meaning "annual exhibition of contemporary paintings and sculpture in Paris" (1875) is from its originally being held in one of the salons of the Louvre, from a secondary sense of the French word, "spacious or elegant apartment for reception of company or artistic exhibitions." Meaning "establishment for hairdressing and beauty care" is by 1913.

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