Etymology
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guilt (v.)

"to influence someone by appealing to his sense of guiltiness," by 1995, from guilt (n.). Related: Guilted; guilting. Old English had also a verbal form, gyltan (Middle English gilt), but it was intransitive and meant "to commit an offense, act criminally."

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pang (n.)

1520s, "sudden paroxysm of physical pain, acute painful spasm," a word of unknown origin, not found in Middle English. Perhaps it is related to prong (prongys of deth is recorded from mid-15c.). Reference to mental or emotional pain is from 1560s. As a verb, "cause or suffer a pang or pangs," c. 1500. Related: Pangs.

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guilt (n.)

Old English gylt "crime, sin, moral defect, failure of duty," of unknown origin, though some suspect a connection to Old English gieldan "to pay for, debt," but OED editors find this "inadmissible phonologically." The -u- is an unetymological insertion. In law, "That state of a moral agent which results from his commission of a crime or an offense wilfully or by consent" [Century Dictionary], from early 14c. Then use for "sense of guilt," considered erroneous by purists, is first recorded 1680s. Guilt by association recorded by 1919.

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remorseful (adj.)

"characterized by remorse, burdened with a painful sense of guilt and penitence due to consciousness of guilt," 1590s, from remorse + -ful. Related: Remorsefully; remorsefulness.

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throe (n.)

c. 1200, throwe "pain, pang of childbirth, agony of death," of uncertain origin, possibly from Old English þrawan "twist, turn, writhe" (see throw (v.)), or altered from Old English þrea (genitive þrawe) "affliction, pang, evil; threat, persecution" (related to þrowian "to suffer"), from Proto-Germanic *thrawo (source also of Middle High German dro "threat," German drohen "to threaten"). Modern spelling first recorded 1610s. Related: Throes.

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culpability (n.)

"blamableness," 1670s, from Late Latin culpabilitas "guilt, culpability," from Latin culpabilis "worthy of blame," from culpare "to blame," from culpa "crime, fault, blame, guilt, error." 

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guiltless (adj.)

late Old English gyltleas; see guilt (n.) + -less. Related: Guiltlessly; guiltlessness.

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exculpatory (adj.)

"fitted or intended to clear from a charge of fault or guilt; exonerating, excusing," 1779, from exculpate + -ory.

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self-abasement (n.)

"humiliation proceeding from guilt, shame, or consciousness of unworthiness; degradation of oneself by one's own act," 1650s; see self- + abasement

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Ate 

Greek goddess or personification of infatuation and blundering mischief, from atē "damage, ruin; guilt; blindness, dazzlement, infatuation; penalty, fine," which is of uncertain origin.

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