Etymology
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growth (n.)
1550s, "stage in growing," from grow + -th (2), on model of health, stealth, etc. Compare Old Norse groði, from groa "to grow." Meaning "that which has grown" is from 1570s; "process of growing" is from 1580s. Old English used grownes "increase, prosperity."
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regrowth (n.)

"a growing again, a new or second growth," 1741, from re- "back, again" + growth.

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undergrowth (n.)
"shrubs or small trees growing amid larger ones," c. 1600, from under + growth.
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overgrowth (n.)

"exuberant or excessive growth," c. 1600, from over- + growth. Also see overgrown.

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outgrowth (n.)

"that which grows from or out of anything," especially an excrescence from the surface of a plant, 1801, from out- + growth. The figurative sense, in reference to inanimate things, "a development or result from a cause or beginning or from some earlier state" is by 1828.

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grown (adj.)
late 14c., "increased in growth," past-participle adjective from grow (v.). Meaning "arrived at full growth, mature" is from 1640s.
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dysplasia (n.)

"abnormal growth or development of tissue, cells, etc.," 1935, Modern Latin, from dys- "abnormal, imperfect" + -plasia "formation, growth, development." Related: Dysplastic.

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-phyte 
word-forming element meaning "plant, plant characteristic; planting, growth; abnormal growth," from Greek phyton "plant," literally "that which has grown," from phyein "to bring forth, make grow," from PIE root *bheue- "to be, exist, grow."
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neoplasia (n.)

"the formation of neoplasms," 1868; see neo- "new" + -plasia "formation, growth."

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cru (n.)

"French vineyard," 1824, from French cru "vineyard," literally "growth" (16c.), from Old French crois (12c.; Modern French croît), from croiss-, stem of croistre "growth, augment, increase," ultimately from Latin crescere "come forth, spring up, grow, thrive" (from PIE root *ker- (2) "to grow").

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