Etymology
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growing (adj.)
Old English, present-participle adjective from grow (v.). Growing season is attested from 1729; growing pains by 1752.
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growing (n.)
late 14c., "a gradual increase, action of causing to increase," verbal noun from grow (v.). Meaning "that which has grown, a crop" is from 1540s. Dialectal growsome "tending to make things grow" is from 1570s.
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adolescent (adj.)
1785, "growing toward maturity," from Latin adolescentem/adulescentem (nominative adolescens/adulescens) "growing, near maturity, youthful," present participle of adolescere "grow up, come to maturity, ripen" (see adolescent (n.)).
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growth (n.)
1550s, "stage in growing," from grow + -th (2), on model of health, stealth, etc. Compare Old Norse groði, from groa "to grow." Meaning "that which has grown" is from 1570s; "process of growing" is from 1580s. Old English used grownes "increase, prosperity."
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regrowth (n.)

"a growing again, a new or second growth," 1741, from re- "back, again" + growth.

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wooded (adj.)
"covered with growing trees," c. 1600, from wood (n.).
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juvenescence (n.)
"the state of growing or being young," 1766; see juvenescent + -ence.
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undergrowth (n.)
"shrubs or small trees growing amid larger ones," c. 1600, from under + growth.
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concretion (n.)

c. 1600, "act of growing together or uniting in one mass;" 1640s, "mass of solid matter formed by growing together or conglomeration," from French concrétion (16c.) or directly from Latin concretionem (nominative concretio) "a compacting, uniting, condensing; materiality, matter," from concretus "condensed, congealed" (see concrete (adj.) ). Related: Concretional; concretionary.

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endogenous (adj.)
"growing or proceeding from within," especially with reference to a class of plants including cereals, palms, plantains, etc., 1822, from endo- "within" + -genous "producing."
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