Etymology
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noise (v.)

late 14c., noisen, "to praise; to talk loudly about, spread by rumor or report," from noise (n.) or from Old French noisier, from the noun in French. Related: Noised; noising.

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noise (n.)

c. 1200, "sound of a musical instrument;" mid-13c., "loud speech, outcry, clamor, shouting;" c. 1300, "a sound of any kind from any source," especially a loud and disagreeable sound, from Old French noise "din, disturbance, uproar, brawl" (11c., in modern French only in phrase chercher noise "to pick a quarrel"), also "rumor, report, news," a word of uncertain origin, replacing Replaced native gedyn (see din).

According to some, it is from Latin nausea "disgust, annoyance, discomfort," literally "seasickness" (see nausea). According to others, it is from Latin noxia "hurting, injury, damage." OED considers that "the sense of the word is against both suggestions," but nausea could have developed a sense in Vulgar Latin of "unpleasant situation, noise, quarrel" (compare Old Provençal nauza "noise, quarrel"). Confusion with annoy, noisome, and other similar words seems to have occurred.

From c. 1300 as "a disturbance; report, rumor, scandal." In Middle English sometimes also "a pleasant sound." In 16c.-17c. "a band or company of musicians." Noises off, as a stage instruction in theater, "sound effects, usually loud and confused, made off stage but to be heard by the audience as part of the play," is by 1908.

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ground (adj.)
"reduced to fine particles by grinding," 1765, past-participle adjective from grind (v.).
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ground (n.)

Old English grund "bottom; foundation; surface of the earth," also "abyss, Hell," and "bottom of the sea" (a sense preserved in run aground), from Proto-Germanic *grundu-, which seems to have meant "deep place" (source also of Old Frisian, Old Saxon, Danish, Swedish grund, Dutch grond, Old High German grunt, German Grund "ground, soil, bottom;" Old Norse grunn "a shallow place," grund "field, plain," grunnr "bottom"). No known cognates outside Germanic.

Sense of "reason, motive" first attested c. 1200. Meaning "source, origin, cause" is from c. 1400. Electrical sense "connection with the earth" is from 1870 (in telegraphy). Meaning "place where one takes position" is from 1610s; hence stand (one's) ground (1707). To run to ground in fox-hunting is from 1779. Ground rule (1890) originally was a rule designed for a specific playing field (ground or grounds in this sense attested by 1718); by 1953 it had come to mean "a basic rule."

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ground (v.)
mid-13c., "to put on the ground, to strike down to the ground;" late 14c., "lay the foundation of," also, figuratively, "to base" (an argument, sermon, etc.), from ground (n.). Meaning "instruct thoroughly in the basics" is from late 14c. Of ships, "to run into the ground," from mid-15c. (intransitive), transitive sense from 1650s. Of arms, from 1711. Electrical sense from 1881. Meaning "deny privileges" is 1940s, originally a punishment meted out to pilots (in which sense it is attested from 1930). In the sense "establish firmly" Old English had grundweallian, grundstaðelian; also gryndan "descend," gegryndan "to found."
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white noise (n.)
"sound made up of a random mixture of frequencies and intensities," by 1970, from white (adj.) + noise (n.).
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noise-maker (n.)

1810, "person or thing that makes noise," from noise (n.) + agent noun from make (v.). The verbal phrase make noise is from mid-13c., and noise-making is from early 15c.

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ground-breaking (adj.)
also groundbreaking, 1907 as a figurative adjective, from expression to break ground (1650s), either for planting or for building, which was in figurative use by 1884; see ground (n.) + break (v.).
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ground-swell (n.)
also groundswell, "broad, deep swell of the sea," 1783, from ground (n.) + swell (n.). Figurative sense (of sound, emotion, etc.) is attested from 1817.
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camp-ground (n.)
also campground, "place for camping," 1806, from camp (n.) or (v.) + ground (n.).
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