Etymology
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hormone (n.)
"organic compound produced in animal bodies to regulate activity and behavior," 1905, from Greek hormon "that which sets in motion," present participle of horman "impel, urge on," from horme "onset, impulse," from PIE *or-sma-, from root *er- (1) "to move, set in motion." Used by Hippocrates to denote a vital principle; modern scientific meaning coined by English physiologist Ernest Henry Starling (1866-1927). Jung used horme (1915) in reference to hypothetical mental energy that drives unconscious activities and instincts. Related: Hormones.
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hormonal (adj.)
1926, from hormone + -al (1). Earlier as a noun, the name of a spleen hormone. Related: Hormonally.
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androgen (n.)
"male sex hormone," 1936, from andro- "man, male" + -gen "thing that produces or causes."
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-in (2)
word-forming element in chemistry, usually indicating a neutral substance, antibiotic, vitamin, or hormone; a modification and specialized use of -ine (2).
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prolactin (n.)

"hormone which promotes lactation," 1932, from pro- + stem of lactation + chemical suffix -in (2).

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catecholamine (n.)

type of hormone, 1960, from catechol (1880), from catechu, 17c. name for an astringent substance used in medicines, dyeing, etc., which apparently is from Malay (Austronesian) kachu.

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auxin (n.)
plant growth hormone, 1934, from German (1931), from Greek auxein "to increase" (from PIE root *aug- (1) "to increase") + chemical suffix -in (2).
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testosterone (n.)
male sex hormone, 1935, from German Testosteron (1935), coined from a presumed combining form of Latin testis "testicle" (see testis) + first syllable of sterol + chemical ending -one.
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insulin (n.)
1922 (earlier insuline, 1914), coined in English from Latin insula "island" (see isle and compare insula); so called because the hormone is secreted by the islets of Langerhans in the pancreas. Insuline was coined independently in French in 1909.
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cortisone (n.)

"steroid hormone found in the adrenal cortex," manufactured synthetically as an anti-inflammatory, 1949, coined by its discoverer, Dr. Edward C. Kendall, from a shortening of its chemical name, 17-hydroxy-11 dehydrocorticosterone, which is ultimately from Latin corticis (genitive of cortex; see cortical) and so called because it was obtained from the "external covering" of adrenal glands. Originally called Compound E (1936).

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