Etymology
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gloomy (adj.)
1580s, probably from gloom (n.) even though that word is not attested as early as this one. Shakespeare used it of woods, Marlowe of persons. Gloomy Gus has been used in a general sense of "sullen person" since 1902, the name of a pessimistic and defeatist newspaper comics character introduced about that time by U.S. illustrator Frederick Burr Opper. Related: Gloomily; gloominess.
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gloom (n.)
1590s, originally Scottish, "a sullen look," probably from gloom (v.) "look sullen or displeased" (late 14c., gloumen), of unknown origin; perhaps from an unrecorded Old English verb or from a Scandinavian source (compare Norwegian dialectal glome "to stare somberly"), or from Middle Low German glum "turbid," Dutch gluren "to leer." Not considered to be related to Old English glom "twilight" (see gloaming).

Sense of "darkness, obscurity" is first recorded 1629 in Milton's poetry; that of "melancholy, dejection, cloudiness or cheerless heaviness of mind" is from 1744; but gloomy with a corresponding sense is attested from 1580s.
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darksome (adj.)

"somewhat dark, gloomy, shadowy," 1520s; see dark (adj.) + -some.

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somber (adj.)

1760 "gloomy, shadowy" (earlier sombrous, c. 1730), from French sombre "dark, gloomy," from Old French sombre (14c.), from an adjective from Late Latin subumbrare "to shadow," from sub "under" (see sub-) + umbra "shade, shadow" (perhaps from a suffixed form of PIE *andho- "blind, dark;" see umbrage). Related: Somberly; somberness.

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funereal (adj.)

"suitable for a funeral" (mournful, dismal, gloomy), 1725, from stem of Latin funereus "of a funeral," from funus "funeral; death" (see funeral) + -al (1). Perhaps by influence of French funerail.

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moodiness (n.)

Old English modignes "pride, passion, anger;" see moody + -ness. Meaning "condition of being subject to gloomy spells, peevishness, sullenness" is from 1858.

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murky (adj.)

"dark, obscure, gloomy," mid-14c., from murk + -y (2). Rare before 17c. The older adjective was simply murk. Related: Murkily; murkiness.

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glum (adj.)
1540s, "sullen, moody, frowning," from Middle English gloumen (v.) "become dark" (c. 1300), later gloumben "look gloomy or sullen" (late 14c.); see gloom. Or from or influenced by Low German glum "gloomy, troubled, turbid." In English the word was also formerly a noun meaning "a sullen look" (1520s). An 18c. extended or colloquial form glump led to the expression the glumps "a fit of sulkiness." Glunch (1719) was a Scottish variant. Related: Glumly; glumness.
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droopy (adj.)

"dejected, sad, gloomy," c.1200, drupie, perhaps from droop, perhaps from Old Norse drupr "drooping spirits, faintness."

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tenebrism (n.)
1959, with -ism + tenebroso (1886), in reference to 17c. Italian painters in the style of Caravaggio, from Italian tenebroso "dark," from Latin tenebrosus "dark, gloomy," from tenebrae "darkness" (see temerity).
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