Etymology
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hoarding (n.)

"act of getting and storing up," 1590s, verbal noun from hoard (v.).

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escapologist (n.)

performer who specializes in getting out of confinement, 1926; see escape + -ologist. Related: Escapology.

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ahem 

attention-getting interjection, c. 1600, lengthened from hem, which is imitative of clearing one's throat (as if about to speak).

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electable (adj.)

1758, "qualified for election;" see elect (v.) + -able. Meaning "capable of getting enough support to win an election" is by 1962. Related: Electability.

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logger (n.1)

"one who fells or cuts trees, one employed in getting out timber from forests," by 1708, agent noun from log (v.1).

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tanning (n.)

late 15c., "process of tanning leather," verbal noun from tan (v.). Intransitive sense "process of getting suntan" is from 1944. Tanning booth is attested by 1978; tanning bed by 1981.

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readiness (n.)

mid-14c., redinesse, "state of preparation, preparedness, a being or getting ready;" late 14c., "promptness, quickness;" from ready (adj.) + -ness. As "willingness, eagerness" from c. 1400.

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cow-pox (n.)

also cowpox, disease of cattle, 1780, see cow (n.) + pox. The fluid of the vesicles can communicate it to humans, and getting it provides almost complete immunity to smallpox.

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out (n.)

late 15c., "egress," from out (adj). From 1620s, "a being out" (of something), from out (adv.). From 1764 in politics as "the party which is out of office." From 1860 in the baseball sense "act of getting an opposing player out of active play." From 1919 as "means of escape; alibi."

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pons (n.)

"bridge," in anatomy and in various Latin expressions, from Latin pons "bridge, connecting gallery, walkway," earlier probably "way, passage," from PIE root *pent- "to go, tread" (see find (v.)). Especially pons asinorum "bridge of asses," nickname since early 16c. for the fifth proposition of the first book of Euclid, which students and slow wits find difficulty in "getting over": if two sides of a triangle are equal, the angles opposite these sides also are equal. "The original allusion seems to have been to the difficulty of getting asses to cross a bridge" [Century Dictionary]. The Latin word is the source of Italian ponte, French pont, Spanish puente.

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