Etymology
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geological (adj.)

1791, from geology + -ical. Related: Geologically.

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phenomenon (n.)

1570s, "a fact directly observed, a thing that appears or is perceived, an occurrence," especially a regular kind of fact observed on certain kinds of occasions, from Late Latin phænomenon, from Greek phainomenon "that which appears or is seen," noun use of neuter present participle of phainesthai "to appear," passive of phainein "bring to light, cause to appear, show" (from PIE root *bha- (1) "to shine"). Meaning "extraordinary occurrence" is recorded by 1771. In philosophy, "an appearance or immediate object of experience" (1788). The plural is phenomena.

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sinkhole (n.)

also sink-hole, mid-15c., "sewage pit, hole for foul liquids to pass through," from sink (n.) + hole (n.). Also sink-fall. As a geological phenomenon, "cavity formed in the earth in limestone regions by underground erosion," by 1780, from sink (v.).

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phenom (n.)

shortened form of phenomenon, U.S. baseball slang, attested by 1890.

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epiphenomenon (n.)

"secondary symptom," 1706, from epi- + phenomenon. Plural is epiphenomena. Related: Epiphenomenal.

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phenomena (n.)

classical plural of phenomenon (see -a (2)). Sometimes also erroneously used as a singular.

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promnesia (n.)

scientific name for the phenomenon of déjà vu, 1895, Modern Latin, from Greek pro "before" (see pro-) + -mnēsia "memory" (see amnesia).

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Paleozoic (adj.)

in reference to the geological era between the Precambrian and the Mesozoic, a geological series characterized by the earliest record of modern life forms, 1838, coined by Adam Sedgwick (1785-1873) from paleo- "ancient" + Greek zoe "life" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + -ic.

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Jurassic (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the geological period between the Triassic and the Cretaceous," 1823, from French Jurassique, literally "of the Jura Mountains," between France and Switzerland, whose limestones were laid down during this geological period. The name was chosen by von Humboldt. As a noun from 1831. The name is said to be from Gaulish *iuris "wooded mountain."

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psi (n.)

23rd letter of the Greek alphabet. Its use for "psychic force, paranormal phenomenon" dates from 1942 (probably from psychic (adj.)).

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