Etymology
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percept (n.)

"immediate object in perception," 1837, from Latin perceptum "(a thing) perceived," noun use of neuter past participle of percipere "to perceive" (see perceive). Formed on model of concept.

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perceptual (adj.)

"of or pertaining to perception," 1852, from percept + -ual as in factual. Related: Perceptually.

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perceptible (adj.)

early 15c., "perceptive, capable of perceiving," from Old French perceptible and directly from Late Latin perceptibilis "perceptible," from Latin percept-, past-participle stem of percipere (see perceive). Meaning "capable of coming under the cognizance of the senses" is from c. 1600. Related: Perceptibly; perceptibility.

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freehold (n.)
"landed estate in possession of a freeman," late 15c., later generalized to any outright ownership of land, a translation of Anglo-French fraunc tenement; see free (adj.) + hold (n.1).
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slump (n.)
"act of slumping, slumping movement," 1850; "heavy decline in prices on the stock exchange," 1888, from slump (v.). Generalized by 1922 to "sharp decline in trade or business."
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kung fu (n.)

also kung-fu, 1966, a generalized Western term for Chinese martial arts, from dialectal Chinese kung fu, a term said to refer to any skill acquired through learning or practice.

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hotbed (n.)
also hot-bed, 1620s, "bed of earth heated by fermenting manure for growing early plants," from hot (adj.) + bed (n.). Generalized sense of "place that fosters rapid growth" is from 1768.
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viable (adj.)
1828, from French viable "capable of life" (1530s), from vie "life" (from Latin vita "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + -able. Originally of newborn infants; generalized sense is first recorded 1848. Related: Viably.
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scruffy (adj.)

1650s, "covered with scurf," from scruff "dandruff, scurf" (late Old English variant of scurf) + -y (2). The generalized sense of "rough and dirty" is by 1871 ("Mark Twain"). Related: Scruffily; scruffiness.

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perceptive (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the act or power of perceiving," 1650s, from Latin percept-, past-participle stem of percipere (see perceive) + -ive. In reference to intelligence from 1860. From mid-15c. as the name of a type of optical instrument or magic glass revealing future events. The older word in the mental sense was perceptible (q.v.); also compare Middle English perceivaunt "observant" (late 14c.), from Old French and Medieval Latin. Related: Perceptively; perceptiveness.

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