Etymology
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frustration (n.)

"act of frustrating, disappointment, defeat," 1550s, from Latin frustrationem (nominative frustratio) "a deception, a disappointment," noun of action from past-participle stem of frustrari "to deceive, disappoint, make vain," from frustra (adv.) "in vain, in error," which is related to fraus "injury, harm," a word of uncertain origin (see fraud). Earlier (mid-15c.) with a now-obsolete sense of "nullification."

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discomfiture (n.)

mid-14c., "defeat in battle, overthrow," from Old French desconfiture "rout, defeat" (12c.; Modern French déconfiture), from desconfire (see discomfit). Sense of "frustration, disappointment" is from late 14c. Confused since 15c. with discomforture "discouragement, distress."

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gamer (n.)

mid-15c., "an athlete" (mid-13c. as a surname, Johannes le Gamer), agent noun from game (v.). Meaning "one devoted to playing video or computer games" is attested by 1981 (by 1975 in reference to players of Dungeons & Dragons). Gamester is attested from 1580s but also sometimes meant "prostitute" (compare old slang The Game "sexual intercourse" (by 1930s), probably from the first game ever played "copulation"). From 1550s as "a gambler." Gamesman is from 1947.

Quite a few of the gamers we've encountered during our monthly strolls down "Arcade Alley" suffer the same chronic frustration: finding enough opponents to slake their thirst for endless hours of play. [Video magazine, May 1981]
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