Etymology
Advertisement
friendship (n.)

Old English freondscipe "friendship, mutual liking and regard," also "conjugal love;" see friend (n.) + -ship. Similar formation in Dutch vriendschap, German Freundschaft, Swedish frändskap.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
loving (n.)

"love, friendship," also "sexual love," late 14c., verbal noun from love (v.).

Related entries & more 
amity (n.)

mid-15c., "friendly relations," especially between nations, from Old French amitie, earlier amistie (13c.) "friendship, affection, love, favor," from Vulgar Latin *amicitatem (nominative *amicitas) "friendship" (source also of Spanish amistad), corresponding to Latin amicitia, from amicus (adj.) "friendly," which ultimately is from amare "to love" (see Amy).

Related entries & more 
cronyism (n.)

1840, "friendship," from crony + -ism. Meaning "appointment of friends to important positions, regardless of ability" is originally American English, by 1952.

Related entries & more 
-philia 

word-forming element meaning "friendship, fondness, tendency toward," and in recent use "abnormal attraction to," from Greek philia "affection," from philos "loving," which is of uncertain origin. Related: -philic.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
familiarity (n.)

c. 1200, "closeness of personal association, intimacy," from Old French familiarite and directly from Latin familiaritatem (nominative familiaritas) "intimacy, friendship, close acquaintance," from familiaris "friendly, intimate" (see familiar). Meaning "undue intimacy" is from late 14c. That of "state of being habitually acquainted" is from c. 1600.

Related entries & more 
keepsake (n.)

"anything kept or given to be kept for the sake of the giver; a token of friendship," 1790, from keep (v.) + sake (n.1); an unusual formation on model of namesake; thus an object kept for the sake of the giver. The word was used c. 1830s in titles of popular holiday gift books containing beautiful engravings and mediocre poetry. As an adjective by 1839.

Related entries & more 
acquaintance (n.)

c. 1300, "state of being acquainted;" late 14c., "person with whom one is acquainted;" also "personal knowledge;" from Old French acointance "acquaintance, friendship, familiarity," noun of action from acointer "make known" (see acquaint). Acquaintant (17c.), would have been better in the "person known" sense but is now obsolete. Fowler regards acquaintanceship (1792) as a "needless variant."

Related entries & more 
affiliation (n.)

1751, "adoption," from French affiliation, from Medieval Latin affiliationem (nominative affiliatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin affiliare "to adopt as a son," from ad "to" (see ad-) + filius "son" (see filial).

The figurative sense of "adoption by a society," in reference to a local chapter or branch, is recorded by 1799 (the verb affiliate in a related sense is from 1761). The meaning "friendship, relationship, association" is by 1852.

Related entries & more 
friend (v.)

in the Facebook sense, attested from 2005, from the noun. Friend occasionally has been used as a verb in English since c. 1200 ("to be friends"), though the more usual verb for "join in friendship, act as a friend" is befriend. Related: Friended; friending. Old English had freonsped "an abundance of friends" (see speed (n.)); freondleast "want of friends;" freondspedig "rich in friends."

Related entries & more