Etymology
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Francis 
masc. proper name, from French François, from Old French Franceis "noble, free," as a noun "a Frenchman, inhabitant of Ile-de-France; the French language," from Late Latin Franciscus, literally "Frankish;" cognate with French and frank (adj.).
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Franciscan (n.)
1590s, "friar of the order founded in 1209 by St. Francis (Medieval Latin Franciscus) of Assisi" (1182-1226). Also as an adjective.
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Frances 
fem. proper name, from French, from Old French Franceise (Modern French Françoise), fem. of Franceis (see Francis).
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San Francisco 
city in California, U.S., named in Spanish for St. Francis of Assisi; the name first recorded in reference to this region 1590s, reinforced by long association of the area with the Franciscan order.
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Beaufort scale 

to measure wind velocity, developed 1806 by Francis Beaufort, Irish-born surveyor and hydrologist.

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anticyclone (n.)

"outward rotary flow of air from an area of atmospheric high pressure," 1863, coined by Francis Galton, English polymath, explorer, and meteorologist, from anti- + cyclone. Related: Anticyclonic.

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Richter 

in reference to the logarithmic scale for expressing magnitude of earthquakes, 1938, named for its deviser, U.S. seismologist Charles Francis Richter (1900-1985). Figurative use by 1967.

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happiness (n.)
1520s, "good fortune," from happy + -ness. Meaning "pleasant and contented mental state" is from 1590s. Phrase greatest happiness for the greatest number was in Francis Hutcheson (1725) but later was associated with Bentham.
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penology (n.)

"study of punishment for crime and crime prevention," 1838, coined apparently by Francis Lieber, corresponding member of the Philadephia Society for Alleviating the Miseries of Public Prisons, from pen- as in penitentiary (ultimately from Latin poena "penalty, punishment;" see penal) + -ology "study of." Related: Penologist; penological.

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percentile (n.)

in statistics, "each of a series of values obtained by dividing a large number of quantities into 100 equal groups in order of magnitude," 1885, coined by English scientist Francis Galton (1822-1911) from percent + -ile.

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