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73 entries found.
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founder (v.)
early 14c. "to send to the bottom" (transitive); late 14c., "to sink or fall" (intransitive), from Old French fondrer "collapse; submerge, sink, fall to the bottom" (Modern French fondrier), from fond "bottom" (12c.), from Latin fundus "bottom, foundation" (see fund (n.)). Not especially of ships in Middle English, where it typically meant "fall to the ground." Figurative use from 1580s. Related: Foundered; foundering.
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founder (n.1)
"one who establishes, one who sets up or institutes (something)," mid-14c., from Anglo-French fundur, Old French fondeor "founder, originator" (Modern French fondateur), from Latin fundator, agent noun from fundare "to lay a foundation" (see found (v.1)). Fem. form foundress is from early 15c.; also fundatrix (1540s).
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founder (n.2)
"one who casts metal," c. 1400, agent noun from found (v.2).
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co-founder (n.)

"one who founds something together with or at the same time as another," c. 1600, from co- + founder (n.). The verb co-found (1630s) probably is a back-formation. Related: Co-founded.

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flounder (v.)
"struggle awkwardly and impotently," especially when hampered somehow, 1590s, of uncertain origin, perhaps from an alteration of founder (n.), influenced by Dutch flodderen "to flop about," or native verbs in fl- expressing clumsy motion. Figurative use is from 1680s. Related: Floundered; floundering. As a noun, "act of struggling," by 1867.
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Garamond 
1780, typeface named for 16c. French type-founder Claude Garamond.
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Remy Martin (n.)

proprietary name of a type of cognac, from French Rémy Martin, from the name of the founder (1724).

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Hanbali 
Sunni school or sect in Islam, from Arabic, from the name of founder Ahmad ibn Hanbal (780-855).
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Gupta (adj.)
1871 in reference to the 4c.-6c. North Indian dynasty, from Chandragupta, name of the founder.
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Hanafi 
Sunni school or sect in Islam, from Arabic, from the name of founder Abu Hanifah of Kufa (c. 700-770).
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