Etymology
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foulness (n.)
Old English fulness "foulness, filthy smell;" see foul (adj.) + -ness. Similar formation in Old Frisian fulnisse, Dutch vuilnis, German fäulniss.
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filth (n.)
Old English fylð "uncleanness, impurity, foulness," from Proto-Germanic *fulitho (source also of Old Saxon fulitha "foulness, filth," Dutch vuilte, Old High German fulida), noun derivative of *fulo- "foul" (see foul (adj.)). A classic case of i-mutation.
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hore (n.)
"dirt, filth," also hor; from Old English horh "phlegm, mucus," horu "foulness, dirt, defilement," from Proto-Germanic *horwo- (source also of Old Frisian hore, Old High German horo, Old Norse horr), perhaps imitative of coughing up phlegm.
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bilge (n.)

1510s, "lowest internal part of a ship," also used of the foulness which collects there; variant of bulge "ship's hull," also "leather bag," from Old North French boulge "leather sack," from Late Latin bulga "leather sack," apparently from Gaulish bulga (see bulge (n.)) and compare budget (n.)).

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impure (adj.)

mid-15c., of wine, "muddy, not clear," from Old French impur (13c.), from Latin impurus "not pure, unclean, filthy, foul," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + purus "pure" (see pure).

In English, the subsequent order of sense appearance seems to be "earthly, mundane, not spiritual" (c. 1500); "obscene, lewd, unchaste, immoral" (1530s); "mixed with offensive matter, tainted" (1590s); "mixed or combined with other things" (without reference to foulness), 1620s. As a noun from 1784. Related: Impurely.

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poontang (n.)

"female genitalia," also "sex with a woman; woman regarded as a sex object," c. 1910, a word of uncertain origin.  Shortened form poon is recorded by 1969.

Probably via New Orleans Creole, from French putain "prostitute," from Old French pute "whore" (cognate with Spanish and Provençal puta), probably from Vulgar Latin *puttus "girl" (source of Old Italian putta "girl"), from Latin putus (originally "pure, bright, splendid"). But also possibly from or influenced by Old French put, from Latin putidus "stinking" on notion of the "foulness" of harlotry [Buck], or for more literal reasons (among the 16c.-17c. slang terms for "whore" in English were polecat, which might also be a pun, and fling-stink).

Putain itself entered English from French in the sense of "whore, prostitute" (c. 1300), mostly in the phrase fitz a putain "whoreson, son of a whore." Putage in old legal language meant "prostitution" (late 15c.).

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