Etymology
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foment (v.)
early 15c., "apply hot liquids," from Old French fomenter "apply hot compress (to a wound)" (13c.), from Late Latin fomentare, from Latin fomentum "warm application, poultice," contraction of *fovimentum, from fovere "to warm; cherish, encourage" (see fever). Extended sense of "stimulate, instigate" (1620s), on the notion of "encourage the growth of," as if by heat, probably was taken from French. Related: Fomented; fomenting.
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fomentation (n.)

c. 1400, from Late Latin fomentationem (nominative fomentatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of fomentare "to foment," from Latin fomentum (see foment).

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embrocate (v.)

"moisten and rub (a bruised or injured part of the body) with a liquid substance," 1610s, from Medieval Latin embrocatus, past participle of embrocare, from Late Latin embrocha, from Greek embrokhe "lotion, fomentation," from embrekhein "to soak in, foment," from assimilated form of en (see en- (2)) + brekhein "to water, wet, rain, send rain," related to brokhe "rain," from PIE root *mergh- "to wet, sprinkle, rain." Related: Embrocated; embrocating; embrocation (early 15c.).

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