Etymology
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outflow (n.)

1869, "act or fact of flowing out, a flowing out or forth;" 1875, "that which flows out," from out- + flow (n.).

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mellifluent (adj.)

"flowing like honey, smoothly or sweetly flowing," c. 1600, from French mellifluent and directly from Late Latin mellifluentem (nominative mellifluens), related to mellifluus (see mellifluous). Related: Mellifluence.

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mellifluous (adj.)

early 15c., "sweet as honey, pleasing, sweetly or smoothly flowing" (of an odor, a style of speaking or writing, etc.), from Late Latin mellifluus "flowing with (or as if with) honey," from Latin mel (genitive mellis) "honey" (related to Greek meli "honey;" from PIE root *melit- "honey") + -fluus "flowing," from fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Related: Melifluously; melifluousness.

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interflow (n.)
"a flowing into each other," 1839, from inter- + flow (n.).
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fluid (adj.)

early 15c., "liquid, capable of flowing," from Old French fluide (14c.) and directly from Latin fluidus "fluid, flowing, moist," from fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Figurative use, of non-material things, "not fixed or rigid," from 1640s. Related: Fluidly.

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Ethan 
masc. proper name, from Hebrew ethan "strong, permanent, perennial, ever-flowing" (of rivers).
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alluvial (adj.)
"deposited by flowing water," 1794; see alluvium + -al (1).
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influent (adj.)
mid-15c., "abundant, flowing in," in reference to occult power of the stars, etc., also of grace, from Latin influentem (nominative influens) "flowing in," present participle of influere "to flow in" (see influence (n.)). Also occasionally in the sense "influential" (1630s).
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reflux (n.)

early 15c., "a flowing back" (of the sea, etc.), "ebb tide," also figurative of instability, from Medieval Latin refluxus, from Latin re- "back, again" (see re-) + fluxus "a flowing," from fluere "to flow" (see fluent). Digestive sense is recorded from 1937; reflux-valve is attested by 1853.

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fluid (n.)
"substance capable of flowing," 1660s, from fluid (adj.). Related: Fluidal (1869), fluidic (1821, Marmaduke Tulket).
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