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19 entries found.
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delimitation (n.)

"the fixing or marking of limits or boundaries," 1816, from French délimitation (18c.), noun of action from délimiter (see delimit).

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bollard (n.)
1844, originally a strong, upright post along a dock for fixing hawsers for mooring ships; since 1948, usually a traffic control device; probably from bole + suffix -ard.
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dyeing (n.)

"the operation or practice of fixing colors in solution in textiles, hides, hair, etc.," late 14c., verbal noun from dye (v.).

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pitching (n.)

late 14c., "act of planting or fixing in the ground," verbal noun from pitch (v.1). From 1650s as "act of throwing or hurling;" specifically in baseball by 1858.

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fixture (n.)
1590s, "act of fixing," perhaps from fix (v.) on model of mixture, or from an assumed Latin *fixitatem. Meaning "anything fixed or securely fastened" is from 1812, an alteration of fixure (c. 1600).
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fixings (n.)
"apparatus," 1820, American English, from fixing "act of putting in order" (c. 1600), verbal noun from fix (v.). American English sense of "food, garnishing" is attested from 1839.
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appointment (n.)
early 15c., "an agreement," also "a fixing of a date for official business," from Old French apointement, from apointer "arrange, settle, place" (see appoint). Meaning "act of placing in office" is attested from 1650s.
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settlement (n.)
1620s, "act of fixing or steadying;" from settle (v.) + -ment. Meaning "a colony," especially a new one, "tract of country newly developed" is attested from 1690s; that of "small village on the frontier" is from 1827, American English. Sense of "payment of an account" is from 1729; legal sense "a settling of arrangements" (of divorce, property transfer, etc.) is from 1670s.
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mordant (adj.)

late 15c., "caustic, biting, severe" (of words, speech), from Old French mordant, literally "biting," present participle of mordre "to bite," from Latin mordēre "to bite, bite into; nip, sting;" figuratively "to pain, cause hurt," which is perhaps from an extended form of PIE root *mer- "to rub away, harm." Related: Mordantly.

The noun is first attested in a now-obsolete or archaic sense of "ornamented hooked clasp of a belt or girdle" (mid-14c.), from Old French mordant in this sense. In dyeing, "substance used in fixing colors," it is attested by 1791; as an adjective in dyeing, "having the property of fixing colors," by 1902. Related: Mordancy; mordantly.

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emplacement (n.)

"a putting or fixing in place; a place or site," 1742, formerly also implacement; from French emplacement "place, situation," from verb emplacer, from assimilated form of en- "in" (see en- (1)) + placer "to place" from place "place, spot" (see place (n.)). Military sense of "the space within a fortification allotted for the position and service of a gun or battery" is attested from 1811.

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