Etymology
Advertisement
font (n.1)
"water basin," especially used in baptism, late Old English, from Latin fons (genitive fontis) "fountain" (see fountain), especially in Medieval Latin fons baptismalis "baptismal font." The word is sometimes used poetically for "a fountain; a source."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
width (n.)
1620s, formed from wide on model of breadth, and replacing wideness (Old English widnes). Johnson (1755) calls it "a low word." Related: Widthwise.
Related entries & more 
fixed (adj.)
late 14c., of stars, "unchangeable in position," past-participle adjective from fix (v.). Related: fixedly (1590s). Fixed-income (n.) is from 1767.
Related entries & more 
font (n.2)

"complete set of characters of a particular face and size of printing type," 1680s (also fount); earlier "a casting" (1570s); from French fonte "a casting," noun use of fem. past participle of fondre "to melt," from Latin fundere (past participle fusus) "to melt, cast, pour out" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). So called because all the letters in a given set were cast at the same time.

Related entries & more 
typeface (n.)

also type-face, 1852, "top of a type," from type (n.) in the printing sense + face (n.). In modern common usage, synonymous with font (n.2), but there is a technical distinction: the typeface is the set of characters of the same design; the font is the physical (or electronic) means of producing them.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
bandwidth (n.)
1930, in electronics, from band (n.1) + width.
Related entries & more 
fount (n.)

"spring of water," 1590s, probably a shortening of fountain influenced by French font "fount." Figurative use also is from 1590s.

Related entries & more 
breadth (n.)
"distance between the sides," late 14c., alteration of brede "breadth," from Old English brædu "breadth, width, extent," from bræd; probably by analogy of long/length.
Related entries & more 
wrath (n.)
Old English wræððu "anger," from wrað "angry" (see wroth) + -þu, from Proto-Germanic -itho (as in strength, width etc.; see -th (2)).
Related entries & more 
laxity (n.)

1520s, from French laxité, from Latin laxitatem (nominative laxitas) "width, spaciousness," from laxus "loose, lax" (see lax). An earlier noun was laxation (late 14c.). Laxness is from 1630s.

Related entries & more