Etymology
Advertisement
fireplace (n.)

also fire-place, c. 1700, from fire (n.) + place (n.).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
chimney (n.)

late 13c., "furnace;" late 14c., "smoke vent of a fireplace, vertical structure raised above a house for smoke to escape to the open air;" from Old French cheminee "fireplace; room with a fireplace; hearth; chimney stack" (12c., Modern French cheminée), from Medieval Latin caminata "a fireplace," from Late Latin (camera) caminata "fireplace; room with a fireplace," from Latin caminatus, adjective of caminus "furnace, forge; hearth, oven; flue," from Greek kaminos "furnace, oven, brick kiln," which is of uncertain origin.

From the persistence of the medial i in OF. it is seen that the word was not an ancient popular word, but a very early adoption of caminata with subsequent phonetic evolution [OED]

Jamieson [1808] notes that in vulgar use in Scotland it typically was pronounced "chimley." From the same source are Old High German cheminata, German Kamin, Russian kaminu, Polish komin. Chimney-corner "space beside a fireplace" is from 1570s. 

Related entries & more 
foyer (n.)

"lobby of a theater or opera house," 1859, from French foyer "green room, room for actors when not on stage," literally "fireplace," from Old French foier "furnace, stove, hearth, fireplace" (12c.), from Latin focarium, noun use of neuter of adjective focarius "having to do with the hearth," from focus "hearth, fireplace" (see focus (n.)).

Related entries & more 
chimenea (n.)

"free-standing fireplace," by 1987, from Mexican Spanish, literally "chimney," from Spanish, ultimately from Latin caminata (see chimney).

Related entries & more 
mantelpiece (n.)

"the horizontal shelf or hood above a fireplace," 1680s, from mantel + piece (n.1).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hearth (n.)

Old English heorð "hearth, fireplace, part of a floor on which a fire is made," also in transferred use "house, home, fireside," from Proto-Germanic *hertha- "burning place" (source also of Old Saxon and Old Frisian herth, Middle Dutch hert, Dutch haard, German Herd "floor, ground, fireplace"), from PIE *kerta-, from root *ker- (3) "heat, fire." Hearth-rug is from 1824. Hearth-stone is from early 14c.

Related entries & more 
hob (n.)

"side of fireplace," 1670s, alteration of hubbe (1510s), of unknown origin, perhaps somehow related to the first element in hobnail.

Related entries & more 
focaccia (n.)

by 1994, from Italian focaccia, from Late Latin focacia, fem. of focacius, used of breads baked under the ashes, from Latin focus "hearth, fireplace" (see focus (n.)). Cognate with Spanish hogaza, Old French foace "griddle cake" (Modern French fouasse "a cake, bun"), Provençal fogassa.

Related entries & more 
ingle (n.1)

"fireplace," c. 1500, from Scottish, usually said to be from Gaelic aingeal "fire, light" ("but there are difficulties" [OED]), a word of uncertain origin. The vogue for Scottish poetry in late 18c. introduced ingleside "fireside" (1747) and ingle-nook,inglenook "corner by the fire" (1773) to literary English.

Related entries & more 
mantel (n.)

c. 1200, "short, loose, sleeveless cloak," variant of mantle (q.v.). Sense of "movable shelter for soldiers besieging a fort" is from 1520s.

The meaning "timber or stone supporting masonry above a fireplace" is attested by 1510s; it is a shortened form of Middle English mantiltre "mantle-tree" (late 15c.) "beam of oak or some other hard wood above a fireplace or oven" (with tree in the now-obsolete sense of "beam"). But the exact meaning of mantle in that had become obscure by the 19c.

In a fire-place, the mantle or mantlepiece, may have been either a covered or chimney-piece; or the part below it to which a hanging, for the sake of making a flue for the wind to draw up the fire, was attached. The details, however, of this are uncertain. [Robert Gordon Latham, "A Dictionary of the English Language," 1882]

Mantel-clock "clock intended to sit on a mantle-shelf," is by 1824.

Related entries & more