Etymology
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final (adj.)
early 14c., from Old French final "final, last," and directly from Late Latin finalis "of or pertaining to an end, concluding, final," from finis "end" (see finish (v.)). As a noun, late 14c., "that which comes last;" meaning "final contest" in a sporting sense is from 1880. As a shortening of final examination, from 1880.
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causality (n.)

c. 1600, "that which constitutes a cause," from causal + -ity. From 1640s as "the relation of cause to effect."

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final solution (n.)
1947, translation of German Endlösung, name given to Nazi Jewish policy from 1941.
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finals (n.)
short for final exams, by 1890; see final (adj.).
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semifinal (adj.)

also semi-final, in sports, in reference to the match or round immediately proceeding the final one, 1867, from semi- + final. As a noun from 1868.

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finality (n.)

1540s, "a goal, a guiding object," from French finalité, from Late Latin finalitatem (nominative finalitas) "state of being final," from Latin finalis "last, of or pertaining to an end" (see final). From 1833 as "quality or state of being final."

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ultimate (adj.)

1650s, from Late Latin ultimatus, past participle of ultimare "to be final, come to an end," from Latin ultimus (fem. ultima) "last, final, farthest, most distant, extreme," superlative of *ulter "beyond" (from suffixed form of PIE root *al- "beyond"). As a noun from 1680s. Ultimate Frisbee is attested by 1972.

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Armageddon (n.)

"cataclysmic final conflict," 1811, figurative use of the place-name in Revelation xvi.16, site of the great and final conflict, from Hebrew Har Megiddon "Mount of Megiddo," a city in central Palestine, site of important Israelite battles.

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ultimatum (n.)
"final demand," 1731, from Modern Latin, from Medieval Latin ultimatum "a final statement," noun use of Latin adjective ultimatum "last possible, final," neuter of ultimatus (see ultimate). The Latin plural ultimata was used by the Romans as a noun, "what is farthest or most remote; the last, the end." In slang c. 1820s, ultimatum was used for "the buttocks."
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finalize (v.)
1850, from final + -ize. Related: Finalized; finalizing.
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