Etymology
Advertisement
film-maker (n.)
also filmmaker, 1859 as a solution used in developing photographs, later "a producer of film for cameras" (by 1889), from film (n.) + maker. As "producer of a cinematographic work, movie-maker," from 1905.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
film (v.)
c. 1600, "to cover with a film or thin skin," from film (v.). Intransitive sense is from 1844. Meaning "to make a movie of" is from 1899. Related: Filmed; filming.
Related entries & more 
film (n.)

Old English filmen "membrane, thin skin, foreskin," from West Germanic *filminjan (source also of Old Frisian filmene "skin," Old English fell "hide"), extended from Proto-Germanic *fello(m) "animal hide," from PIE root *pel- (3) "skin, hide."

Sense of "a thin coat of something" is 1570s, extended by 1845 to the coating of chemical gel on photographic plates. By 1895 this also meant the coating plus the paper or celluloid. Hence "a motion picture" (1905); sense of "film-making as a craft or art" is from 1920.

Related entries & more 
maker (n.)

c. 1300, "one who creates, shapes, forms, or molds," also "God as creator," agent noun from make (v.). Specifically, "manufacturer" by late 14c. To meet (one's) maker "die" is attested by 1814.

Related entries & more 
cabinet-maker (n.)
"one whose occupation is the making of household furniture," 1680s, from cabinet + maker.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
film noir (n.)
1958, from French, literally "black film," from noir (12c.), from Latin niger (see Negro).
Related entries & more 
film-strip (n.)
also filmstrip, 1930, from film (n.) + strip (n.).
Related entries & more 
coach-maker (n.)

also coachmaker, "a maker of (horse-drawn) coaches," 1590s, from coach (n.) + maker.

Related entries & more 
money-maker (n.)

late 13c, "one who coins money," from money + maker. Sense of "one who accumulates money" is by 1864; meaning "thing which yields profit" is from 1899. To make money "earn pay" is attested from mid-15c. Money-making (adj.) "lucrative, profitable" is from 1862.

Related entries & more 
widow-maker (n.)
"something lethally dangerous" (war, the sea, dangerous machinery, etc.), 1590s, from widow (n.) + maker.
Related entries & more