Etymology
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fighting (adj.)

"qualified or trained to fight," mid-14c., present-participle adjective from fight (v.). Fighting chance is from 1877; fighting mad is attested by 1750; fighting words is by 1882. Fighty "pugnacious" is attested from c. 1200.

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fighting (n.)

early 13c., "act of engaging in combat," verbal noun from fight (v.). Old English had feohtlac (n.) "fighting, battle." Nautical fighting-top "platform near the top of a mast for small-arms fire" is from 1890.

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in-fighting (n.)

1816, in pugilism, the practice of getting at close quarters with an opponent; see in + fighting. Old English infiht (n.) meant "brawl within a house or between members of a household." Middle English had infight (v.) "to attack" (c. 1300); the modern verb infight "fight at close quarters" (1916) appears to be a back-formation from in-fighting. Related: In-fighter (1812).

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cock-fighting (n.)

mid-15c., cokfytyng, match or contest between cocks (see cock (n.1)). Cock-fight (n.) is from 1560s.

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game-cock 

cock bred for fighting or from fighting stock, 1670s, from game (n.) in the sporting and amusement sense + cock (n.1). Figurative use by 1727.

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boxiana (n.)

"the lore and annals of prize-fighting," by 1819, mock-Latin, from box (v.2).

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tauromachy (n.)

"bull-fighting," 1830, from Greek tauromakhia; see Taurus + -machy.

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alectryomachy (n.)

also alectoromachy, "cock-fighting," 1650s, from Latinized form of Greek alektryon "cock" (see alectryomancy) + -machy.

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Andromache 

wife of Hector, Latin Andromache, from Greek Andromakhē, perhaps literally "whose husband excels in fighting," fem. of andromakhos "fighting with men;" see anthropo- + -machy.

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pugilism (n.)

"the art or practice of fighting with the fists, gloved or not," 1789, from Latin pugil "boxer, fist-fighter," related to pugnus "fist" (from suffixed form of PIE root *peuk- "to prick") + -ism. Pugilation "fighting with fists," now obsolete, is recorded from 1650s.

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