Etymology
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fellowship (n.)

c. 1200, feolahschipe "companionship," from fellow + -ship. Sense of "a body of companions" is from late 13c. Meaning "spirit of comradeship, friendliness" is from late 14c. As a state of privilege in English colleges, from 1530s. In Middle English it was at times a euphemism for "sexual intercourse" (carnal fellowship).

To fellowship with is to hold communion with; to unite with in doctrine and discipline. This barbarism now appears with disgusting frequency in the reports of ecclesiastical conventions, and in the religious newspapers generally. [Bartlett, "Dictionary of Americanisms," 1848]

But Chaucer and Wyclif used it as a verb in Middle English, "to have fellowship with."

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companionship (n.)

"fellowship, association, company," 1540s, from companion + -ship.

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koinonia (n.)

"Christian fellowship," 1865, Greek, literally "communion, fellowship," from koinos "common, ordinary" (see coeno-).

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intercommunion (n.)

1749, "intimate intercourse, fellowship," from inter- "between" + communion (n.).

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consortium (n.)

1829, "fellowship, association," from Latin consortium "fellowship, participation, society," from consors (genitive consortis; see consort (n.1)). Earlier, in British law, it was a term for "right of husband's access to his wife" and is attested from 1650s as a Latin word in English.

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camaraderie (n.)

"companionship, good-fellowship," 1840, from French camaraderie, from camarade "comrade" (see comrade).

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togetherness (n.)

1650s, "state of being together," from together + -ness. Sense of "fellowship, fellow-feeling," is from 1930.

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sociality (n.)

1640s, from French socialité or directly from Latin socialitas "fellowship, sociableness," from socialis (see social (adj.)).

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companionable (adj.)

"fitted for good fellowship, inclined to be agreeable," 1620s, from companion + -able. Middle English had compaignable "sociable, hospitable, kind, friendly" (late 14c.), from Old French. Related: Companionably; companionability.

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sodality (n.)

"companionship, fellowship, association with others," c. 1600, from French sodalité or directly from Latin sodalitatem (nominative sodalitas) "companionship, a brotherhood, association, fellowship," from sodalis "companion," perhaps literally "one's own, relative," related to suescere "to accustom," from PIE *swedh-, extended form of root *s(w)e-, pronoun of the third person and reflexive (see idiom). Especially of religious guilds in the Catholic Church.

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