Etymology
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failure (n.)
1640s, failer, "a failing, deficiency," also "act of failing," from Anglo-French failer, Old French falir "be lacking; not succeed" (see fail (v.)). The verb in Anglo-French used as a noun; ending altered 17c. in English to conform with words in -ure. Meaning "thing or person considered as a failure" is from 1837.
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fail (n.)
late 13c., "failure, deficiency" (as in without fail), from Old French faile "deficiency," from falir (see fail (v.)). The Anglo-French form of the verb, failer, also came to be used as a noun, hence failure.
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non-performance (n.)

also nonperformance, "failure or neglect to perform," c. 1500, from non- + performance.

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non-compliance (n.)

also noncompliance, "failure or refusal to comply," 1680s, from non- + compliance. Related: Noncompliant.

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default (n.)
Origin and meaning of default

early 13c., "offense, crime, sin;" late 13c., "a failing or failure, failure to act," from Old French defaute (12c.) "fault, defect, failure, culpability, lack, privation," from Vulgar Latin *defallita "a deficiency or failure," past participle of *defallere, from Latin de "away" (see de-) + fallere "to deceive, to cheat; to put wrong, to lead astray, cause to be mistaken; to escape notice of, be concealed from" (see fail (v.)). The financial sense is first recorded 1858; the computing sense is from 1966.

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non-attendance (n.)

also nonattendance, "failure to attend, omission of attendance," 1680s, from non- + attendance.

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stumble (n.)
1540s, "act of stumbling," from stumble (v.). Meaning "a failure, false step" is from 1640s.
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non-payment (n.)

also nonpayment, "failure to pay," early 15c., non-paiement, from non- + payment.

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failing (n.)
late 14c., "failure;" 1580s, "defect, fault," verbal noun from fail (v.).
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congestive (adj.)

"pertaining to or causing congestion," 1817, from congest + -ive. Congestive heart failure is recorded from 1928.

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