Etymology
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extension (n.)

c. 1400, "swelling, bulging," from Latin extensionem/extentionem (nominative extensio/extentio) "a stretching out, extension," noun of action from past-participle stem of extendere (see extend). In a concrete sense, "extended portion of something" (a railroad, etc.), from 1852. Telephone sense is from 1906.

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yippee (interj.)

interjection of pleasure, exultation, etc., by 1902; perhaps an extension and modification of hip (interj.).

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prexy (n.)

1871, college slang, an extension or diminutive of prex.

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one-off (n.)

"single example of a manufactured product," by 1927, from one + off. Later given figurative extension.

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clone (v.)

1959, from clone (n.). Extension to genetic duplication of animals and human beings is from 1970. Related: Cloned; cloning.

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Dixiecrat (n.)

in U.S. politics, "Democratic politician from the South who seceded from the party over the extension of civil rights," 1948, from Dixie + ending from Democrat.

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blotch (n.)
c. 1600, perhaps an extension of blot (n.) by influence of botch or patch. Also from c. 1600 as a verb. Related: Blotched; blotching.
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pancake (v.)
"to squeeze flat," 1879, from pancake (n.). Later, of aircraft, "to fall flat" (1911), with figurative extension. Related: Pancaked; pancaking.
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land (v.2)
"to make contact, to hit home" (of a blow, etc.), by 1881, perhaps altered from lend (v.) in a playful sense, or else a sense extension of land (v.1).
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pen (n.3)

slang, "prison," 1884, shortening of penitentiary; earlier use (1845) probably is a figurative extension of pen (n.2) "enclosure for animals."

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