Etymology
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expressive (adj.)
c. 1400, "tending to press out," from French expressif, from expres "clear, plain," from stem of Latin exprimere "to press out," also "to represent, describe" (see express (v.)). Meaning "full of expression" is from 1680s. Related: Expressively; expressiveness.
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impassioned (adj.)
"expressive of strong feeling, filled with passion," c. 1600, past-participle adjective from impassion.
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endearment (n.)
"act of endearing," 1610s, from endear + -ment. Meaning "obligation of gratitude" is from 1620s; that of "action expressive of love" is from 1702.
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reverential (adj.)

"characterized by or expressive of reverence," 1550s, from Latin reverentia "awe, respect" (see reverence (n.)) + -al (1). Related: Reverentially.

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amatory (adj.)
1590s, "pertaining to love, expressive of love" (especially sexual love), from Latin amatorius "loving, amorous," from amatus, past participle of amare "to love" (see Amy). Related: Amatorial.
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factitive (adj.)
"causative, expressive of making or causing," 1813, from Latin factus, past participle of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put") + -ive.
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holophrastic (adj.)
"having the force of a whole phrase; expressive of a complex idea," 1837, from holo- "whole" + Latinized form of Greek phrastikos, from phrazein "to indicate, tell, express" (see phrase (n.)).
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soulful (adj.)
"full of feeling," 1860, from soul (n.1) + -ful. Meaning "expressive of characteristic Black feeling" is from 1964 (see soul (n.2)). Earlier as a noun (1640s), "as much as a soul can hold."
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emphatic (adj.)

"uttered, or to be uttered, with emphasis of stress or voice," 1708, from Latinized form of Greek emphatikos, variant of emphantikos, from stem of emphainein (see emphasis). Emphatical is earlier (1550s in rhetorical sense, 1570s as "strongly expressive"). Related: Emphatically (1580s).

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flummox (v.)
1837, cant word, also flummux, of uncertain origin, probably risen out of a British dialect (OED finds candidate words in Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, southern Cheshire, and Sheffield). "The formation seems to be onomatopœic, expressive of the notion of throwing down roughly and untidily" [OED]. Related: Flummoxed; flummoxing.
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