Etymology
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self-deprecating (adj.)

"marked by expressed disapproval of oneself," 1835, from self- + deprecating (see deprecate).

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disapprobation (n.)

"act or fact of disapproving; censure, expressed or unexpressed," 1640s; see dis- + approbation.

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portrayal (n.)

"act of portraying," 1834, from portray + -al (2). The idea formerly was expressed by portray (n.), 1610s.

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restatement (n.)

"a second statement, a statement expressed over in a new way" as of facts or opinions, 1785, from restate + -ment.

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implied (adj.)

"intended but not expressed," 1520s, past-participle adjective from imply (v.). Implied powers in a constitutional sense is attested from 1784.

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standstill (n.)

"state of cessation of movement," 1702, from stand (v.) + still (adv.). Earlier the notion would have been expressed simply by stand.

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care-free (adj.)

also carefree, "free from cares," 1795, from care (n.) + free (adj.). In Old English and Middle English this idea was expressed by careless.

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wording (n.)

"choice of words, manner in which something is expressed," apparently coined by Milton in "Eikonoklastes" (1649). From present participle of word (v.).

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meaning (n.)

c. 1300, meninge, "sense, that which is intended to be expressed," also "act of remembering" (a sense now obsolete), verbal noun from mean (v.). Sense of "significance, import" is from 1680s.

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numen (n.)

"divine spirit, presiding divinity," 1620s, from Latin numen "divine will, divinity," literally "a nod" (the notion is "divine approval expressed by nodding the head"), from nuere "to nod" (assent); see numinous.

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