Etymology
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express (v.1)

late 14c., "represent in visual arts; put into words," from Old French espresser, expresser "press, squeeze out; speak one's mind" (Modern French exprimer), Medieval Latin expressare, frequentative of Latin exprimere "represent, describe, portray, imitate, translate," literally "to press out" (source also of Italian espresso); the sense evolution here perhaps is via an intermediary sense such as "clay, etc., that under pressure takes the form of an image," from ex "out" (see ex-) + pressare "to press, push," from Latin premere "to press, hold fast, cover, crowd, compress" (from PIE root *per- (4) "to strike"). Related: Expressed; expresses; expressing; expressible.

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express (adj.)
late 14c., "stated explicitly, not implied, clearly made known" from Old French espres, expres (13c.), from Latin expressus "clearly presented, distinct, articulated precisely," past participle of exprimere (see express (v.1)). Also late 14c. as an adverb, "specially, on purpose;" it also doubled as an adverb in Old French. An express train (1841) originally was one that ran to a certain station.
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express (n.)
1610s, "special messenger," from express (adj.). Sense of "business or system for sending money or parcels" is by 1794.
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express (v.2)
"to send by express service," 1716, from express (n.).
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mirth (n.)

Old English myrgð "joy, pleasure, eternal bliss, salvation" (original senses now obsolete), from Proto-Germanic *murgitha (source also of Middle Dutch merchte), noun of quality from *murgjo- (see merry; also see -th (2)). By early 13c. as "expressions or manifestations of happiness, rejoicing;" by mid-14c. as "state or feeling of merriment, jollity, hilarity."  Mirthquake "entertainment that excites convulsive laughter" first attested 1928, in reference to Harold Lloyd movies.

I HAVE always preferred chearfulness to mirth. The latter, I consider as an act, the former as an habit of the mind. Mirth is short and transient, chearfulness fixed and permanent. Those are often raised into the greatest transports of mirth, who are subject to the greatest depressions of melancholy: on the contrary, chearfulness, though it does not give the mind such an exquisite gladness, prevents us from falling into any depths of sorrow. Mirth is like a flash of lightning, that breaks through a gloom of clouds, and glitters for a moment; chearfulness keeps up a kind of day-light in the mind, and fills it with a steady and perpetual serenity. [Addison, "Spectator," May 17, 1712]
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mirthless (adj.)

"joyless, without mirth, unhappy," late 14c., from mirth + -less. Related: Mirthlessly.

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mirthful (adj.)

early 14c., "delightful," from mirth + -ful. Related: Mirthfully; mirthfulness.

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drollery (n.)

"sportive tricks, something made or done to raise mirth," 1590s, from French drôlerie (16c.), from drôle (see droll + -ery).

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Comus 

late classical god of joy and festive mirth, 1630s, from Latin, from Greek komos "a revel, merrymaking, a band of revelers" (see comedy).

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Amex 
1970, contraction of American Express, a trademark registered in U.S. 1950 by American Express Co., originally an express mail service. Its credit card dates from 1958.
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