Etymology
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exposure (n.)
c. 1600, "public exhibition," from expose (v.) + -ure. Sense of "situation with regard to sun or weather" is from 1660s. Photographic sense "act of exposing to light" is from 1839. Indecent exposure attested by 1825.
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overexposure (n.)

also over-exposure, "excessive exposure; an excess of exposure," 1834 in reference to cleavage in women's dress; 1855 in photography, from over- + exposure. Figurative sense, in reference to celebrity, is attested from 1969.  

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show up (v.)

verbal phrase, by 1826 as "to disgrace through exposure;" see show (v.) + up (adv.). The meaning "to put in an appearance, be (merely) present" is by 1888. The noun sense of "an exposure of something concealed" is by 1830, colloquial.

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caffeinism (n.)
"morbid state produced by prolonged or excessive exposure to caffeine," 1880, from caffeine + -ism.
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blackmail (v.)
"to extort money or goods from by intimidation or threat," especially of exposure of some wrong-doing, 1852, from blackmail (n.). Related: Blackmailed; blackmailing.
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publicness (n.)

"character of common possession or interest; openness or exposure to notice or knowledge of the community or of people at large," c. 1600, from public (adj.) + -ness.

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airing (n.)
"action of exposing to air," c. 1600, verbal noun from air (v.). Meaning "display, public exposure" is from 1870.
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publishment (n.)

"act of proclaiming, public exposure," late 15c., from publish (v.) + -ment. In American English, "official notice by a civic or religious official of an intended marriage" (by 1722).

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outcrop (n.)

in geology, "exposure of rocks at the surface," 1801, from out- + crop (n.) in its sense of "sprout, head."

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cultured (adj.)

1743, of land, etc., "cultivated," adjective from culture. Meaning "developed under controlled natural conditions" is from 1906, originally of pearls. Meaning "refined, improved by exposure to intellectual culture" is by 1777.

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