Etymology
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expenditure (n.)

1769, "act of expending," from Medieval Latin expenditus, irregular past participle of Latin expendere "to weigh out; to pay out" (see expend) + -ure. Meaning "that which is expended" is from 1791. Related: Expenditures.

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expense (v.)

"offset (an expenditure) against an income," 1909, from expense (n.). Related: Expensed; expensing.

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expensive (adj.)

1620s, "given to profuse expenditure," from expense (n.) + -ive. Meaning "costly, requiring profuse expenditure" is from 1630s. Earlier was expenseful (c. 1600). Expenseless was in use mid-17c.-18c., but there seems now nothing notable to which it applies, and the dictionaries label it "obsolete." Related: Expensively; expensiveness.

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parsimonious (adj.)

1590s, "very sparing in expenditure," from Latin parsimonia "frugality, thrift" (see parsimony) + -ous. Not originally with the suggestion of stinginess, but this had emerged by 18c. Related: Parsimoniously; parsimoniousness.

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saving (n.)

early 14c., "salvation;" late 14c., "act of protecting (someone) from danger or death," verbal noun from save (v.).

By 1550s as "economy in expenditure or outlay; a reduction or lessening in expenditure." Savings "sums saved over time by the exercise of care and economy" is by 1727. Savings bank , for encouraging thrift "among people of slender means" [Century Dictionary] is by 1817; savings account is attested by 1882. S & L for savings and loan is attested from 1951. 

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prodigality (n.)

"quality of being prodigal; reckless extravagance in expenditure," mid-14c., prodigalite, from Old French prodigalite (13c., Modern French prodigalité) and directly from Medieval Latin prodigalitatem (nominative prodigalitas) "wastefulness," from Latin *prodigalis, from prodigus "wasteful" (see prodigal).

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profusion (n.)

1540s, "extravagance, expenditure, prodigality, waste," from French profusion (16c.) and directly from Late Latin profusionem (nominative profusio) "a pouring out," noun of action from past-participle stem of profundere "to pour forth" (see profuse). Meaning "abundance, superfluity" is from 1705.

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misspend (v.)

also mis-spend, "to spend amiss or wastefully, use improperly, make a bad or useless expenditure of," late 14c.; see mis- (1) + spend. Related: Misspent (as an adjective, "badly or uselessly employed," since mid-15c. frequently modifying youth); misspending.

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cost (v.)

"be the price of," also, in a general way, "require expenditure of a specified time or labor, or at the expense of (pain, loss, etc.)," late 14c., from Old French coster (Modern French coûter) "to cost," from cost (see cost (n.)). Related: Costing.

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dissipation (n.)

early 15c., dissipacioun, "disintegration, dissolution," from Latin dissipationem (nominative dissipatio) "a scattering," noun of action from past-participle stem of dissipare "to spread abroad, scatter, disperse; squander, disintegrate" (see dissipate). Sense of "act of wasting by misuse, wasteful expenditure or consumption" is from 1630s; meaning "intemperate mode of living, undue indulgence in pleasure" is from 1784.

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