Etymology
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exclude (v.)

"to shut out, debar from admission or participation, prevent from entering or sharing," mid-14c., from Latin excludere "keep out, shut out, hinder," from ex "out" (see ex-) + claudere "to close, shut" (see close (v.)). Related: Excluded; excluding.

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exclusive (adj.)
mid-15c., "so as to exclude;" 1560s, "that excludes," from Medieval Latin exclusivus, from exclus-, past participle stem of excludere (see exclude). Of monopolies, rights, franchises, etc., from 1760s; of social circles, clubs, etc., "unwilling to admit outsiders," from 1822. Related: Exclusively; exclusiveness.
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sluice (n.)
c. 1400, earlier scluse (mid-14c.), a shortening of Old French escluse "sluice, floodgate" (Modern French écluse), from Late Latin exclusa "barrier to shut out water" (in aqua exclusa "water shut out," i.e. separated from the river), from fem. singular of Latin exclusus, past participle of excludere "to shut out" (see exclude).
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*klau- 

also *kleu-, klēu-, Proto-Indo-European root meaning "hook, crook," also "crooked or forked branch" (used as a bar or bolt in primitive structures). 

It forms all or part of: anschluss; autoclave; clause;  claustrophobia; claves; clavichord; clavicle; clavier; claviger; clechy; clef; cloison; cloisonne; cloister; close (v.); close (adj.); closet; closure; cloture; clove (n.1) "dried flowerbud of a certain tropical tree, used as a spice;" cloy; conclave; conclude; disclose; enclave; enclose; exclude; foreclose; include; occlude; preclude; recluse; seclude; slot (n.2) "bar or bolt used to fasten a door, window, etc." 

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek kleis "bar, bolt, key; collarbone," klobos "cage;" Latin clavis "key," clavus "nail," claudere "to shut, close;" Lithuanian kliūti "to catch, be caught on," kliaudžiu, kliausti "to check, hinder," kliūvu, kliūti "to clasp, hang;" Old Church Slavonic ključi "hook, key," ključiti "shut;" Old Irish clo "nail," Middle Irish clithar "hedge, fence;" Old High German sliozan "shut," German schließen "to shut," Schlüssel "key." 

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shutout (n.)
also shut-out, 1889 in baseball sense, from verbal phrase shut out "exclude from a situation" (late 14c.; from 1881 in the sports score sense), from shut (v.) + out (adv.). Middle English had a verb outshut "to shut out, exclude," mid-15c.
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unchurched (adj.)
1680s, from un- (1) "not" + churched "committed or belonging to a church" (see church (v.)). A verb, unchurch "to remove or exclude (someone) from membership in a church" is recorded from 1610s.
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ostracize (v.)

"exile by ostracism, banish by popular vote," also in a figurative sense, "to exclude from society or favor," 1640s, from Latinized form of Greek ostrakizein "to banish," literally "to banish by voting with potshards" (see ostracism). Related: Ostracization; ostracized; ostracizing.

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blackball (v.)
also black-ball, "to exclude from a club by adverse votes," 1770, from black (adj.) + ball (n.1). The image is of the black balls of wood or ivory that were dropped into an urn as adverse votes during secret ballots. Related: Blackballed; blackballing.
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debar (v.)

early 15c., "to shut out, exclude" (from a place), also "prevent, prohibit" (an action), from French débarrer, from Old French desbarer (12c., which, however, meant only "to unbar, unbolt," from des- "do the opposite of" (see dis-) + barrer "to bar," from barre "bar" (see bar (n.1)). The meaning turned around in French as the de- was felt in a different sense, perhaps as an intensifier. Related: Debarment; debarred.

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