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54 entries found.
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excitement (n.)
early 15c., "encouragement;" c. 1600, "something that tends to excite," from excite + -ment. Meaning "condition of mental and emotional agitation" is from 1846.
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overexcitement (n.)

also over-excitement, "excess of excitement," 1815, from over- + excitement.

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hubba-hubba (interj.)

U.S. slang cry of excitement or enthusiasm, by 1944.

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orgasm (n.)

1680s, "sexual climax, the acme of venereal excitement," from French orgasme or Modern Latin orgasmus, from Greek orgasmos "excitement, swelling," from organ "be in heat, become ripe for," literally "to swell, be excited," related to orge "impulse, excitement, anger," from PIE root *wrog- "to burgeon, swell with strength" (source also of Sanskrit urja "a nourishment, sap, vigor," Old Irish ferc, ferg "anger"). Also used 17c. of other violent excitements of emotion or other bodily functions; broader sense of "immoderate excitement or action" is from 1763.

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doodah (n.)

"excitement," 1915, from refrain of the popular minstrel song "Camptown Races."

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rampage (n.)

"animated fit of anger or excitement," hence "excited action of any kind," 1861, from rampage (v.).

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arrah (interj.)
supposedly a characteristic Irish expression of emotion or excitement, 1705 (Farquhar).
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horniness (n.)
1885, "degree to which something is or resembles horn;" by 1957 in the "state of advanced sexual excitement" sense; from horny + -ness.
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jumpy (adj.)
"nervous," 1869, from jump (n.) in a sense "sudden involuntary movement" + -y (2). Related: Jumpiness. The jumps "state of nervous excitement" is from 1872.
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flurry (v.)
1757, "produce agitation of feeling in, confuse by excitement," from flurry (n.). From 1883 of snow. Related: Flurried; flurries; flurrying.
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