Etymology
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exorbitance (n.)

mid-15c., exorbitaunce, "a deviation from what is right, a transgression of normal limitations" (a sense now archaic or obsolete), from exorbitant + -ance. Sense of "extravagance in degree or amount, excessiveness" is from 1640s. Related: Exorbitancy.

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nimiety (n.)

"excess, redundancy, state of being too much," 1560s, from Latin nimietas "excessiveness," from nimius "beyond measure, excessive," from nimis (adv.) "too much, beyond measure, excessively," from *ne-mis- "not little," from PIE root *ne- "not" + *mi- "little," from PIE root *mei- (2) "small."

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excessive (adj.)

"exceeding the usual or proper limit, degree, measure, or proportion; going beyond what is sanctioned by correct principles; immoderate; extravagant; unreasonable;" late 14c., from Old French excessif "excessive, oppressive," from Latin excess-, past-participle stem of excedere "to depart, go beyond" (see exceed). Related: Excessively; excessiveness.

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moderate (v.)

early 15c., "to abate excessiveness, reduce the intensity of;" from Latin moderatus "within bounds, observing moderation;" figuratively "modest, restrained," past participle of moderari "to regulate, mitigate, restrain, temper, set a measure, keep (something) within measure," from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures." Intransitive sense of "become less violent, severe, rigorous, etc." is from 1670s. Meaning "to preside over a debate" is first attested 1570s. Related: Moderated; moderating.

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