Etymology
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exalt (v.)

c. 1400, "to give off vapor, flow out," from Old French exalter (10c.), from Latin exaltare "raise, elevate," from ex "out, out of, from within" (see ex-) + altus "high," literally "grown tall," from PIE root *al- (2) "to grow, nourish." From early 15c. as "to elevate in rank or honor;" also "glorify, praise, extol." Related: Exalted; exalting.

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exaltation (n.)

late 14c, in astrology, "position of a planet in the zodiac where it exerts its greatest influence," from Old French exaltacion "enhancement, elevation," and directly from Late Latin exaltationem (nominative exaltatio) "elevation, pride," noun of action from past-participle stem of exaltare "to raise, elevate" (see exalt).

From late 15c. as "act of raising high or state of being elevated" (in power, rank, dignity, etc.); also "elevation of feeling, state of mind involving rapturous emotions." The Exaltation of the Cross (late 14c.) is the feast commemorating the miraculous apparition seen by Constantine in 317.

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*al- (2)
Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to grow, nourish."

It forms all or part of: abolish; adolescent; adult; alderman; aliment; alimony; Alma; alma mater; alt (2) "high tone;" alti-; altimeter; altitude; alto; alumnus; auld; coalesce; elder (adj., n.1); eldest; Eldred; enhance; exalt; haught; haughty; hautboy; hawser; oboe; old; proletarian; proliferation; prolific; world.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Greek aldaino "make grow, strengthen," althein, althainein "to get well;" Latin alere "to feed, nourish, suckle; bring up, increase," altus "high," literally "grown tall," almus "nurturing, nourishing," alumnus "fosterling, step-child;" Gothic alþeis, Dutch oud, German alt "old;" Gothic alan "to grow up," Old Norse ala "to nourish;" Old Irish alim "I nourish."
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apotheosize (v.)
"exalt to godhood, deify," 1760; see apotheosis + -ize. Related: Apotheosized; apotheosizing. Earlier in same sense was apotheose (1670s).
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heighten (v.)
mid-15c., heightenen, transitive, "to exalt, to honor or raise to high position," from height + -en (1). Intransitive sense of "to become higher" is from 1560s. Related: Heightened; heightening.
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enthrone (v.)

"to place on a throne, exalt to the seat of royalty," c. 1600, from en- (1) + throne (n.). Replacing enthronize (late 14c.), from Old French introniser (13c.), from Late Latin inthronizare, from Greek enthronizein. Also simply throne (v.), late 14c., from the noun in English. Related: Enthroned; enthroning.

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provection (n.)

1650s, "advancement" (a sense now obsolete); 1868 in the philological sense "carrying of the final letter of a word into the next one" (as in newt), from Late Latin provectionem (nominative provectio) "advancement," noun of action from past-participle stem provehere "to carry forward," from pro "toward, ahead" (see pro-) + vehere "to carry" (from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle"). Middle English had a verb provecten "to advance (someone), exalt" (mid-15c.), from Latin provectus, past participle of provehere.

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promote (v.)

late 14c., promoten, "to advance (someone) to a higher grade or office, exalt or raise to a higher post or position," from Old French promoter and directly from Latin promotus, past participle of promovere "move forward, advance; cause to advance, push onward; bring to light, reveal," from pro "forward" (see pro-) + movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

General sense of "to further the growth or progress of (anything)" is from early 15c. In late Middle English and early Modern English also promove, from the Latin verb. Related: Promoted; promoting.

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Jeremiah 
masc. proper name, Old Testament prophet (compare jeremiad) who flourished c. 626-586 B.C.E., from Late Latin Jeremias, from Hebrew Yirmeyah, probably literally "may Jehovah exalt," but Klein suggests it also might be short for Yirmeyahu "the Lord casts, the Lord founds," and compares the first element in Jerusalem. The vernacular form in English was Jeremy.
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dignify (v.)
Origin and meaning of dignify

early 15c., dignifien, "invest with honor or dignity, exalt in rank or office," also "deem suitable," from Old French dignefiier, from Medieval Latin dignificare "make worthy," from Latin dignus "worthy, proper, fitting" (from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept") + -ficare, combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). From mid-15c. as "confer honor upon, give celebrity to, make illustrious." Related: Dignified; dignifying.

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