Etymology
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Kelly 

common Irish surname, from Old Irish ceallach "war." As a type of pool played with 15 balls, it is attested from 1898. Kelly green first recorded 1917.

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Eugene 

masc. proper name, from French Eugène, from Latin Eugenius, from Greek Eugenios, literally "nobility of birth," from eugenes "well-born" (see eugenics).

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Eugenia 

fem. proper name, from Latin, from Greek Eugenia, literally "nobility of birth," fem. of Eugenius (see Eugene).

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gunk (n.)

"viscous substance," 1949, American English, apparently from Gunk, trademark for a thick liquid soap patented 1932 by A.F. Curran Co. of Malden, Mass.

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jeep (n.)

early 1941, American English military slang, acronym from G.P., abbreviation of General Purpose (car), but certainly influenced by Eugene the Jeep (who had extraordinary powers but said only "jeep"), from E.C. Segar's comic strip "Thimble Theater" (home of Popeye the Sailor). Eugene the Jeep first appeared in the strip March 13, 1936. The vehicle was in development from 1940, and the Army planners' initial term for it was light reconnaissance and command car.

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europium (n.)

rare earth element, 1901, named by its discoverer, French chemist Eugène Demarçay (1852-1903) in 1896, from Europe. With metallic element ending -ium.

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creatine (n.)

organic substance obtained from muscular tissue, by 1843, from French creatine, from Greek kreas "flesh, meat" (from PIE root *kreue- "raw flesh") + chemical suffix -ine (2). Discovered 1832 by French physicist Michel-Eugène Chevreul (1786-1889) and named by him.

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lumen (n.)

unit of luminosity, 1897, coined in French 1894 by French physicist André-Eugène Blondel (1863-1938) from Latin lumen "light" (n.), from suffixed form of PIE root *leuk- "light, brightness." Earlier it was used in anatomy for "an opening or passageway" (1873).

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shut-eye (n.)

colloquial for "sleep," 1899, from shut (v.) + eye (n.). Hans Christian Andersen's "Ole Shut-eye," about a being who makes children sleepy, came out 1842; "The Shut-Eye Train" popular children's poem by Eugene Field, is from 1896.

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glucose (n.)

name of a group of sugars (in commercial use, "sugar-syrup from starch"), 1840, from French glucose (1838), said to have been coined by French professor Eugène Melchior Péligot (1811-1890) from Greek gleukos "must, sweet wine," related to glykys "sweet" (see gluco-). It first was obtained from grape sugar. Related: Glucosic.

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