Etymology
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furnished (adj.)

"equipped," 1550s, past-participle adjective from furnish. Of rooms, houses, etc. "provided with furniture," from 1640s.

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mechanized (adj.)

also mechanised, in the military sense of "equipped with or using mechanical vehicles and weapons," 1926, past-participle adjective from mechanize (v.).

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-rigged 

1769, of a vessel, "equipped with rigging" (of a specified sort), from rig (v.).

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armed (adj.)

"equipped for battle," early 13c., past-participle adjective from arm (v.).

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equipment (n.)

1717, "things equipped;" 1748, "action of equipping;" from equip + -ment, or from French équipement. Superseding earlier equipage.

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unfurnished (adj.)

1540s, "not equipped, unprepared," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of furnish (v.). In reference to houses, apartments, etc., "not provided with furniture," it is recorded from 1580s.

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appointed (adj.)

with qualifying adverb, "equipped, furnished," 1530s, from past participle of appoint (v.) in the specialized sense of "equip, furnish" (late 15c.).

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armament (n.)

1650s, "naval force equipped for war," from Latin armamentum "implement," from Latin armare "to arm, furnish with weapons" from arma "weapons" (including defensive armor), literally "tools, implements (of war);" see arm (n.2). The meaning "process of equipping for war" is from 1813.

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swell (adj.)

"fashionably dressed or equipped," 1810, from swell (n.) in the "stylish person" sense. As "good, excellent," by 1897; as a stand-alone expression of satisfaction it is recorded from 1930 in American English.

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yare (adj.)

"ready, prepared," Old English gearo "ready, prepared, equipped," from gearwian "to equip, prepare" (related to gearwe "clothing, dress") from Proto-Germanic *garwjan "to make, prepare, equip, ready, complete" (see gear (n.)). Cognate with German gar, Dutch gaar. Related: Yarely.

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